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It really depends on what you want to use the car for.

So to add to what has already been said: RWD is generally preferred for track where a certain amount of (controlled) oversteer is preferred. AWD tend to be a little heavier in the front and will tend to understeer (push through turns). For street use RWD will probably feel a bit more engaging but due to less than ideal road conditions (temps, precipitation, uneven surfaces, lack of driver experience with at-the-limit handling, etc) most “normal” drivers do better with AWD for casual street use.

If you want to go with a high HP turbo build then AWD is generally advised by UGR and Heffner as the rear wheels will break loose under full boost. Most modern builds allow reduction in boost for the first 2 gears (“boost by gear”) as even with AWD you will spin all 4 tires with 1000+Hp.

My turbo G (AWD) is fantastic for daily use, rainy conditions, varying temps, etc but on a tight race track it feels too heavy through the turns. My stock M2C with RWD and factory tires is better on the track than the G which has R compounds, racing suspension setup and 500+ more HP. However, in a straight line the G will crush the BMW, which spins its rear tires in the first 3 gears.

Again, it just depends on what you use it for. I drive my cars regularly, occasionally track them and I’m not afraid to mod them. Others put on at most 1500miles a year going out for coffee and will never even care if it’s AWD or RWD. To each his own.
 

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Always an emotive subject......... Personally I would go with AWD every time because of the huge extra safety margin it gives when driving on normal roads. It's not as if driving any Lambo in a spirited fashion, whether RWD or AWD, is for for the faint-hearted. Its just that the limits and characteristics are different.

On a race track I would likely prefer the thrill of the RWD. But common sense tells me that AWD is always a better option for road use, if you can afford the additional cost.

As Plumber has so accurately said "each to his own". Just make sure you understand the differences before you purchase, especially if you intend to drive the car to it's limits.
 

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Always an emotive subject......... Personally I would go with AWD every time because of the huge extra safety margin it gives when driving on normal roads. It's not as if driving any Lambo in a spirited fashion, whether RWD or AWD, is for for the faint-hearted. Its just that the limits and characteristics are different.

On a race track I would likely prefer the thrill of the RWD. But common sense tells me that AWD is always a better option for road use, if you can afford the additional cost.
I would just add that spirited driving of a modern Lamborghini is safer by far than the “spirited” driving I see everyday by people with suvs and sedans on run-of-the-mill street tires. Those people have no idea how poorly controlled those vehicles are at speeds of 65mph and greater, whereas the Lambo is stable at more than twice that.
 

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For anyone concerned about driveability in less than ideal weather, may I proffer that tires will by far make the largest difference.

In cold temps even the AWD Huracan will be traction limited due to the max performance summer tires. Once the ambient temperatures dip below roughly 40 degrees F, summer tires loose an appreciable amount of grip. While all wheel drive is helpful in this scenario it is no substitute for a proper set of tires.

In rain, short of trying to put down lots of power, in terms of "safety", being responsibly driven, AWD and RWD comes down to the tires as well (hydroplane resistance, cornering and braking limits, etc). Yes, if you punch it with traction control off in the rain on a RWD, things will transpire, but, you know, don't do that.

I've been driving high power rear wheel drive vehicles for well over a decade and a dedicated set of snow tires is pivotal (even if you have no intention of taking the car in snow) for the colder temps. Much safer, far better traction, and if you do get caught in the snow its not a dire scenario.

I personally loved driving my 458 Italia with Michelin Pilot Alpine PA4 performance snow tires in the winter. NYC area is mostly just cold and miserable, rarely snowy, and rather than sitting in the garage I was able to enjoy my car. Winter also means not worrying about the damn leather dash baking in the sun as much when parked which is nice. When the roads get salty I'd generally just wait for some rainfall and for the grime to clear before regularly using the car again.

Did not melt:

298266


298267
 

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Curious thoughts on this I want AWD but wondering why so many guy’s want RWD

What about wet roads? Much difference?
I am an amateur driver, weekends in the canyons, and 2 times a year at the track. I am very pleased with AWD because of the feeling of control I have. I do not really try to approach the edge of
traction. I have driven the RWD, and the first thing I notice on the track is how often the rear end swings out as compared to the AWD. Well, my friends who are professional drivers, who I have driven with on the track, swear by RWD. They express that the turn their car with their right foot. I appreciate how they enjoy throwing around their rear end, but I do not have their skill level, so my
driving experience liens toward wanting to stay in control and not drift. Any driver can appreciate if they are a drifter or not. I personally to not push my car that hard, nor my tires, so I do not prefer RWD attributes over AWD traction and control. I consider awd to give me the confidence that my car feels like it is on rails, and that works for me.
 

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Whats the best way to learn how to toss a car accurately
At a racetrack, runway, or a very wide-open piece of pavement somewhere. Just do it over and over and over and over and watch the results where you and your car are in safety.

George Eaton sharpened his racing-on-asphalt skill by repeatedly handling spins on frozen lakes up in Canada in winter. It was a safe and slower-acting-spin-and-response laboratory where he learned to handle spin A with action B by sheer repetition and habit.

Another way to sharpen your skills at slower speeds is buy the hardest, least-grippy tires you can find, such as some Pirellis, and practice on asphalt with them. Less grip means less-violent action and longer time for you to formulate, then practice, a response. Another way is in the rain on some wide-open tarmac, such as unused airports. Heck, you can even get skinny wheels and tires to limit traction and thus slow all actions and responses. It would look funny as heck, but it would be a good AND VERY VERY CHEAP learning tool.

If I go 50mph, then suddenly do THIS, what happens? You get to know when your "avoidance maneuver" goes from "missed the cone" to "swung the fat ass over and IT hit the cone."
 

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I got myself the rwd. Every turn. Put on sport. No need tc off. U can swing every turn. Doughnut U turn. If tc off is more funnn
 
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