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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Saturday afternoon at 4pm.

I'm hoping I have not bitten off more than I can chew, but this is something I have been wanting to do for a while. The last oil change I did, I felt like the engine was sitting too close and only a new millimeters above the frame cross member. After some poking around I could tell the engine mounts had never been changed.

I ordered a new pair from Glen H. at AMH and yesterday I decided to tackle it at home. My car is a '91 with just over 19k miles.

So here's the thing, I don't have a lift at home just a bunch of floor jacks.
So I got the back end of the car as high as I could go and started, it was just over 100F outside (Houston, TX in the middle of summer is miserable!!) but I can't do much about that. Anyway about 30 minutes into it, I realize that this cannot be done on my garage floor with the car a few inches from my nose and me laying on my back on the concrete floor. Room is just way too limited and the working area too damn small.

So I call my awesome neighbor and friend who is 76 years and asked really nicely if I can use his lift (2 post) that resides in his 5 car garage. He absolutely insists, he's a huge car guy as well and is excited about a Diablo being at his place. "Fantastic"...I thought!

In the 6 years I've owned my car, this is the VERY first time I've had my car on a lift and it was tricky - it took almost 15 minutes, with the car being so low, so wide and making sure the arms are well placed under the chassis at the correct points. As we all know jacking up a Diablo is a bit of a science.

Once secure and up in the air, I was able to walk under the car....so nice. My body thanked me umpteem times over and it was time to go to work.

Ok enough of the chitter chatter, here are the pictures:

There are four (4) 19mm fairly short bolts holding the engine mount top plate to the frame, these have to be loosened. I started by using a regular length 19mm open ended wrench and then used a stubby 19mm wrench. There is no room to put a socket on this bolt and access is very tight. You have to work slowly, almost 1/4 turn at a time. Fortunately these bolts were not too tight and I was able to break free all four on the right side without any problem. The bolts will only back out so much before hitting the engine block L bracket (see below), so the engine will have to be jacked up and inch or so to give the additional room...painfully slow process..but that's Diablo ownership.




Here's the Left Side, which is even tighter due to the starter and other things that a nearby and yes I have oil leaks to address (!!):


Another view of the left side, at this point I recommend removing the bolted in panel that sits below the oil filter (10 or so M6 bolts) to provide better access.


Better view...




New mounts as a reference:


To really get access to the left side 19mm bolt you will have to do some surgery to your open ended wrench, as access is tight and you will hit the heat shields. As you can see only the best quality tools for my good ole Diablo!


Okay its now 8pm...my lovely wife walked over to the neighbors to determine how I was progressing but really her agenda was "Let's eat...its dinner time"...laughing!

Part two coming today (Sunday morning). If you guys have ever done this, any heads up would be appreciated.

Thanks!
Yasin
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Good work mate. Keep us updated with your progress.
Will do, I finished it yesterday afternoon and will update this thread with pictures showing the removal and installation of the new mounts
Quite a big job. You have to remove the exhaust pipes and untighten the drive shafts afaik.
Incorrect, you do not have to touch the exhaust OR the drive shafts. I completed it with the engine in the car, without having to disturb these items.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
There are two (2) engine mounts both are located about mid point along the engine.

Here is the wrap-up conclusion of this maintenance project.

At this point, I recommend buying a threaded engine \ trans support stand with the foot pump as you will be removing the engine mounts and you need to triangulate the loading to not overstress the existing mounting points and not damage anything. These support stands are inexpensive ($100) and come in handy and can nicely tuck away in the corner of your garage when not in use. I placed it at the rear of the engine just in front of the diff on a section that is cast and not on the aluminum fins to avoid damaging them and also used a piece of wood to not damage anything and uniformly distribute the load.

In the picture below, you can see I have a coolant leak which I am addressing this week.


In this picture, I'm laying on my back looking up at the chassis.


My fun picture!


At this point, its time to remove the engine mounts. I recommend removing one at a time, so as to keep things supported as much as possible.
I used my impact gun to remove these big bolts that are M16 with a 24mm head, they are torqued to well over 120 lbs-ft so an impact is the right tool for the job. This big boy bolt threads to the stamped steel "L" bracket that bolts to the block and has a welded nut on it, so no need to put a wrench on the top side.


Next I recommend loosening two important big bolts, this is easy take only a few minutes. The reason these bolts are removed is to allow the engine to pivot upwards and can then be jacked-up to allow more room to remove and re-install the engine mounts:
First one is under the transmission under the shifter, this is a 22m head bolt the next is the 2mm head bolt that supports the differential.


Second one is the diff mount:








Now that these two (2) bolts are out...NOW you can jack-up the engine with the engine \ transmission jack, here it is going up. You can go up about an inch or so until the engine touches the aluminum water pipes, but that inch is all you need, makes a huge difference.


After that remove the four (4) 17mm bolts that secure the engine mount to the steel L bracket from the block. I also removed the four (4) 13mm nuts holding this L bracket to the block, you have to do this to give yourself more access and room to manipulate. This L bracket is held onto the block with four (4) studs and you will have to work by feel and its a bit slow but very doable. Don't loose the lock washers either and have a zip lock bag ready to put them in.
The engine mount is now and finally ready to come out but because it has been in place for years, I recommend using a good heavy hammer and knocking it upwards and tahdahhh it will break free.

On the left side you have to remove the dip stick which is easy, there are only three (3) 10mm nuts holding it in place, again this is done to provide more room to fish out the old mount and fish in the new one.

The steel L brackets can stay in place, they do not need to be removed.


The right engine mount can be fished out by sliding it towards the front of the car, the rear engine mount is the reverse, slide it towards the rear of the car to remove it. Now you can take a break and do a happy dance!!

Here is a side by side comparison:



Notice the delamination in the rubber bushing in the old mount:






The installation is the reverse of the removal and you should be able to wrap up the installation of the new mounts in a few hours. Remember the big flat washers (three per side) that go on the top and bottom of each mount. My new mounts came with two (2), so I had to only re-use one of these washers.
I also chased all threads of all bolts and carefully cleaned all the fasteners and also applied Anti-Seize to the threads.

This is a massively gratifying project and can be done solo and wrapped up in one (1) day if you start early enough.

Best of luck!
Yasin
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Bruce.
Based on the lack of traffic on this thread, there seems to be less interest compared to the door handle \ engine handle thread I submitted last week.
I hope it proves valuable for even one owner in the future when they decide to attempt this at home.
I took my car for a drive last night and it shreds!
I have some more maintenance items that need to be addressed soon related to some oil leaks, so I'll also submit those as a future reference and like everything I do, it will be a step by step with lots of supporting pictures.
My best,
Yasin
 

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I'll add to the traffic.
Another great post :)

This engine mount "how to" is a big for DIY.
Customized tools, threaded transmission support, lift requirements....in other words, my hat is off (praise) to all co-members with great garages to work in.

Again great post!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks Kenny, I am honestly super blessed to have a neighbor that has a full lift as I am unable to install one in my garage, otherwise it would have been done years ago. My neighbor is great (understatement), as mentioned above he is a true car guy and 76 years young. To say thanks, I am treating him and his wife to a lovely dinner and a Home Depot gift card.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Yassin, I’ll add. Wow! Great job and thank
You for memorializing this for the rest of us.
My pleasure good sir! Glad to be of assistance to the community.
I have some more "to-do's" and threads coming up in the next few weeks to months, so I'll add them as I knock them out and address them..
 
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