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Thanks to all

Mine is sat in my garage I’ve got 3 new hoses on order will have a go myself first then if I can’t manage it will take it to my indie... indie said bleeding can be hard work any tips ?
Nonsense. The system is self bleeding. That's why it has all those thin little hoses running around the engine bay. You do have to burp it when filling up large quantities of coolant, and the best way to do that is to fill it up to the top of the reservoir and then leave it alone for a while. Come back and when the level has dropped, do it again.

Or, if you want to be like a pro, you can use a vacuum filler that will fill the system with fluid, with no burping, right away.
 

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Agreed that preventative maintenance is the way to go but I also see that exotic cars too often are over-serviced with perfectly good parts thrown away for no reason other than paranoia. On my recent engine out service here are some examples of exercising self-control:

1. With the engine out I took the clutch out to inspect it. According to service records and the markings on the unit it was changed 10K ago. Most would immediately change clutches at that mileage. In my case everything looked perfect and the clutch disc was worn 0.4 mm out of an allowable 1.5 mm of wear. Quite simply back it goes and if I get even another 5K out of it then it would be worth it (although I think it will last longer). OEM clutch BTW not a Kevlar unit.

2. The serpentine belt is a pain to get at but mine was replaced 2K and 3 years ago. Visually it looks brand new and the markings are so clean you would never know it is not new. Sure a new belt is only about $100 but why change something that is so early on in its usable life.

3. The rubber coolant hoses were toast but the silicone ones look perfect. The silicone hoses are short and you can see every inch of them in and out. Silicone hoses also do not fail or crack the way rubber ones do in the video. I have years of experience both engineering and dealing with silicone hose manufacturers. When it comes to silicone if it looks like new then it will perform as such.

I totally agree that some parts do have a service life but if you understand how certain parts fail and the ones that give fair warning before they do then it is easier to judge when it is prudent to replace a part and when you are just swapping out parts well before their service life is up. I'm happy to change parts at 80% of their life but not at 20-30%.

The subject of service and service intervals in the exotic car world always entertains me. In the Ferrari world you are supposed to change your timing belts every 3 years and people are TERRIFIED to go past that time. That said true cases of timing belt failure are almost non-existent and I've seen plenty of 10+ year old timing belts that look like new when they were changed out. These same people who live in fear think nothing about revving the crap out of a stone cold Honda or Toyota with 100K and 10+ years on their timing belt. Machines need to be properly serviced but babying them does little more than waste money.
I started in supercars with the Lotus Esprit, which is on the opposite end of the supercar market from Ferrari. Typical Lotus owners spend every penny they have to buy the car and don't have two nickels to rub together for maintenance.

They seem to play a game of how much maintenance they can defer so they literally don't spend a penny on maintaining the car as bragging rights. Of course, the Esprit now has a horrible reliability reputation because of the number of broken timing belts, overheated engines, overboosted engines, etc from the lack of replacing rubber parts.

I definitely prefer to over maintain than under maintain, but my cars are super reliable because of it and I don't end up on the side of the road with steam pouring out of my cars.
 

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The same thing happened to my 2003 Murcielago and it was scary. Glad I’m not on my own with this. I’ ve has my hoses changed now.
 

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Nuvolari and Stimpy, circling back to the hoses I should replace, I got a quote back and just want to make sure they are on the same page as me as to exactly what to replace. Pls see attached. Are these the hoses you guys recommend?

I definitely don't want a Murcie Mark or white out experience this summer :eek:
 

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Nuvolari and Stimpy, circling back to the hoses I should replace, I got a quote back and just want to make sure they are on the same page as me as to exactly what to replace. Pls see attached. Are these the hoses you guys recommend?

I definitely don't want a Murcie Mark or white out experience this summer :eek:
Which ones on the diagram are on your quote?
 

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You 100% want to replace hoses #5,11,20,21 These hoses are rubber and deteriorate faster than the others.

As an option you can replace hoses 17,19, and not shown are 5 hoses that are all the same. 4 go to the rads and one is a joiner for a hard line. All of these hoses are silicone and are not the hoses that typically break. Then again with the whole system apart changing them is cheap as all of these hoses are less than $200 from Lamborghini.

On the subject of hoses, #21 is the weak one that breaks on everyone. The only replacement is a rubber line which will have the same problems. I'm currently having manufactured a special hose for this application from silicone. It is being constructed with additional burst strength and an integral heat shielding material. I want to make this hose problem disappear for Murci owners and am planning on making this hose available. Expected price will be under $100.
 

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There is also a hose between the water pump and the engine that isn't that hard to change once you have everything apart. It tends to bubble out over time, and I have read about one report from an owner of it bursting. And it's silicone. Don't be fooled, silicone hoses don't last forever, so on a car getting to be this age, I would replace all of the coolant hoses in the engine bay instead of half-assing it. It's not that much more work or money to do them all.
 

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Stimpy - they didn't specify but based on the red arrows he drew, I believe it's #1, #20, and #11 but the latter looks like two different ones, yet only 11 looks associated with them.

On this:

"There is also a hose between the water pump and the engine that isn't that hard to change once you have everything apart. It tends to bubble out over time, and I have read about one report from an owner of it bursting. And it's silicone."

Is that numbered on the diagram?

Nuvolari - I thought you advised to not do #5? Wasn't #5 the one you were mentioning here:

"The exception is the hose that goes to the heater because it involves a LOT of disassembly (much much more than all the other hoses combined) and is very unlikely to give problems."

In short guys, I am interested in replacing rubber, as well as any silicone you strongly advise on. I just need to make sure I identify them properly.
 

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Stimpy - they didn't specify but based on the red arrows he drew, I believe it's #1, #20, and #11 but the latter looks like two different ones, yet only 11 looks associated with them.

On this:

"There is also a hose between the water pump and the engine that isn't that hard to change once you have everything apart. It tends to bubble out over time, and I have read about one report from an owner of it bursting. And it's silicone."

Is that numbered on the diagram?

Nuvolari - I thought you advised to not do #5? Wasn't #5 the one you were mentioning here:

"The exception is the hose that goes to the heater because it involves a LOT of disassembly (much much more than all the other hoses combined) and is very unlikely to give problems."

In short guys, I am interested in replacing rubber, as well as any silicone you strongly advise on. I just need to make sure I identify them properly.

The ones with the red arrows are very small diameter hoses that are for auto-bleeding the cooling system. Because they are small diameter hoses, they are not your biggest threat, but should be replaced at the same time.

You really need all the other hoses. As mentioned above, there are short coupler hoses to the radiators and between the coolant pipes which is 5 total (not shown), coupler hoses to the engine (17 and 19), the water pump coupler hose (not shown), the heater hose from the front of the block to near the reservoir (21, and buy a nice heat shield that is the same length as the hose to protect it, the factory tiny blanket is ridiculous), and a hose from the reservoir area to coolant pipes (5).

The hoses from the reservoir area to the heater core in the cabin are not on that diagram, and they are the ones that are not in the engine bay so they don't get tortured as much. And they are very hard to replace.
 

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In my case the small diameter hoses for the auto bleeding were by far the worst. I cannot believe they held pressure and the moment I touched them they crumbled in my fingers snapping in half in multiple sections. These little hoses do not take the engine bay heat very well and are prone to failure even though it is not nearly as prevalent as the larger hose on the front side of the engine.
 

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The thin hoses definitely need to be replaced by now, but they are not as big a threat because their wall thicknesses compared to their tiny inner diameters makes them much less strained than the larger inner diameter hoses that do most of the coolant movement. For catastrophic cooling systen failures, it always seems to be the bigger hoses.
 

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Thank you Stimpy and Nuvolari. Ok let me get this straight for my response to the shop.

-Ask to include the small diameter/thin hoses

-Ask to include #5 (even though this is the long one that goes all the way from the front to the back)

-I will copy/paste this, too: "The short coupler hoses to the radiators and between the coolant pipes which is 5 total (not shown), coupler hoses to the engine (17 and 19), the water pump coupler hose (not shown), the heater hose from the front of the block to near the reservoir (21), and a hose from the reservoir area to coolant pipes (5).

Is that correct?
 

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Thank you Stimpy and Nuvolari. Ok let me get this straight for my response to the shop.

-Ask to include the small diameter/thin hoses

-Ask to include #5 (even though this is the long one that goes all the way from the front to the back)

-I will copy/paste this, too: "The short coupler hoses to the radiators and between the coolant pipes which is 5 total (not shown), coupler hoses to the engine (17 and 19), the water pump coupler hose (not shown), the heater hose from the front of the block to near the reservoir (21), and a hose from the reservoir area to coolant pipes (5).

Is that correct?
Sounds right.
 

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What are the options for non-OEM silicon hoses? I'm sure they'd have a longer life and cost a whole lot less...

WhiteOut, there's another business opportunity to extend your range ;-)
 

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What are the options for non-OEM silicon hoses? I'm sure they'd have a longer life and cost a whole lot less...

WhiteOut, there's another business opportunity to extend your range ;-)
How long of a life are you looking for? Most of the OEM hoses are already silicon, and many people that own early Murci's still haven't changed any hoses (they should be by now), so that's a pretty good lifespan considering in the old days when hoses needed to be changed a lot more frequently.
 

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How long of a life are you looking for? Most of the OEM hoses are already silicon, and many people that own early Murci's still haven't changed any hoses (they should be by now), so that's a pretty good lifespan considering in the old days when hoses needed to be changed a lot more frequently.
15-20 years would be ok. I thought people were having to change them every 6 or 7 years....
 
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