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2011 LP560-4 Spyder / Blu Fontus
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144 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have no pressing plans to change the exhaust on the 2011 BluG. (two other cars in the garage are sufficiently loud if I'm feeling that any given day) I figure maybe wait until a clutch is needed and do it then, only having to rip the back end off once and done.....
PLUS, I do have a car with a valved exhaust where a switch is mounted under the dash to change sound as so desired. I love it because I can have passengers AND conversations, and come home late at night and not give the neighbors any more reason to hate me....
SO, getting to the point I understand how the system works. 04-07 cars are easy, pull the vacuum hose After the solenoid and plug both ends. 08 cars are sketchy and can throw codes. 09+ cars is where it gets cloudy, some say it throws codes and others say it doesn't, some say it works great and others say it does nothing at all. So what's the deal ?? Once again my google search has left me just as confused as when I started. So many varying opinions/experiences. At least now I know how it's configured. (UPDATE - ok, Now I see Stoyan79 reported in a post that he plugged the hoses where they attached to the valves (downstream) and it worked great..... BUT, so what if you don't want it loud ALL the time now....................................)
I guess I'll give it a try, after all it's a cheap gamble. Assuming depriving the valves of vacuum allows the exhaust to bypass the mufflers, why not install a 'normally closed' vacuum solenoid valve. It is the equivalent of cutting that line and plugging both ends. Then when you supply 12v it opens and allows the system to function as designed. Now when you turn that solenoid 'off' the muffler will be bypassed thoughout the RPM range, when you turn it 'on' it will open the solenoid and vacuum will return as controlled by the still existing factory solenoid controlled by the ECM. Now this time, instead of running the wiring to turn that new solenoid on and off all the way back into the dash somewhere, Why not do it with a remote? Then all you need is a chassis ground near the solenoid, and a non-canbus 12v supply voltage (but what to use there, on a spyder the wiring for lid release latch runs right past the existing solenoid valve). Anybody been down this road or have some insight here? I was a factory Ford tech for 12 years until I got sick of playing that game (sorry I was raised blue oval from the day cars interested me and still have one, never forget your roots) so for the Vacuum Control Solenoid I plan on using what Ford calls a Thermactor Air Diverter (TAD) solenoid as I just happen to have one in my tool box. I got the Remote Control set off eBay for just under $20, there are cheaper but this one has two remotes and the box looks well-made for the price and claims to at least be waterproof.....
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2011 LP560-4 Spyder / Blu Fontus
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144 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Sorry I failed to mention the most important feature of the installed 'downstream' solenoid is that it is a vacuum VENT solenoid as used in probably all cars with emission control devices. A simple valve that closes would allow any vacuum present downstream to remain downstream, and the exhaust valves would remain closed until, or if, the vacuum would bleed out. The vacuum vent valve instantly releases the downstream vacuum when the valve is closed but blocks upstream completely.
 

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2011 LP560-4 Spyder / Blu Fontus
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144 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
OK, this is now installed. I can see why some have claimed there's 'no difference' once the vacuum to the valves is blocked off. The difference is subtle at idle if you're sitting in the driver seat going nowhere or standing there manually plugging and unplugging it. However it is obvious if you are driving under load or acceleration. Will be doing some Spring driving here shortly and I'll have to make a video illustrating the difference switching open and closed while driving. Sporty enough for now, but when I do need a clutch and start looking for an aftermarket system, I think my first choice would be another valved system so I could exercise the same benefits of this.
 
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