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Can't help with that question but that is such a long time horizon that may be challenging for any forum member to provide useful insight. Hope someone else can help!
 

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So it appears, based upon the learned insight provided, whatever you pay to buy one today will be a bargain compared to some future date. ;) The only thing to be mindful of, the way the world is going, they may make it a crime to own or drive one of these gas guzzlers in the not too distant future.:giggle:
 

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Gas guzzlers from the 50's-70's with no pollution devices on the engines are running unrestricted today with no inspection requirement for exhaust emissions.
 

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Gas guzzlers from the 50's-70's with no pollution devices on the engines are running unrestricted today with no inspection requirement for exhaust emissions.
That's true but with the Green New Deal.........it gives one pause. That is one deal I would like to pass up!
 

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I can't imagine G's going up long term if that's why your asking; at some point the Audi branded parts you can often swap in, and third party parts, are going to be increasingly hard to come by as those loosely related Audi models get long out of production, forcing Lambo owners back to Lambo-branded parts or expensive one-offs. So we'll be in a situation with an old car that is common enough to not get that uniqueness value pop, but uncommon enough to be very expensive to keep running. When we're at the point where electronics start to fail, especially on e-gear models, that's going to be a nightmare. Perhaps some six speeds will maintain value as those are going to be harder to come by in any car long term. I'd think the earlier G's will slowly head towards $60-70k range, maybe less if they become very difficult to deal with. I have an '06 spyder I mistakenly bought new, so I've already experienced the pain lol, but it's still fun so until it becomes a maintenance problem I'll keep it around.

In contrast, Murci's have done a bit better, albeit with far lower production numbers; especially six speeds. Over the past two years I've been increasingly surprised to see what 6-speed early Murci's are going for; I bought my '03 in 2009 and they seem to be floating around the range of what I'd originally paid for it, so that was a pleasant surprise.
 

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Long Term, everything goes up in value when you're dealing with a rare product like this. Regardless of what kind of people are out there to buy it, but esp. when it's from an exotic marque like this.

Most 30-50+ year old Lamborghinis aren't going for cheap. To put an even finer point on it, look at the price of 1990s Japanese imports (NSX, Supra, Integra R, RX7, etc), these are seeing some massive increases due to rarity (unmolested versions tend to go for more) and a desire for a simpler design. Also, technology would only get more complicated in cars (even the Huracan is a tech extravaganza), that actually will probably make the simplicity of Gs more desirable.
 

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Long Term, everything goes up in value when you're dealing with a rare product like this. Regardless of what kind of people are out there to buy it, but esp. when it's from an exotic marque like this.

Most 30-50+ year old Lamborghinis aren't going for cheap. To put an even finer point on it, look at the price of 1990s Japanese imports (NSX, Supra, Integra R, RX7, etc), these are seeing some massive increases due to rarity (unmolested versions tend to go for more) and a desire for a simpler design. Also, technology would only get more complicated in cars (even the Huracan is a tech extravaganza), that actually will probably make the simplicity of Gs more desirable.
Well said I agree.
 

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Just out of curiosity, where do you see Gallardo values in 10-20 years?
Most replies have supported the inexorable climb in value that all exotics experience. Not sure I agree that these cars will be legislated off the road since there will be so few of them to ruin the environment. History has shown us the common thread of pricing on these cars. The initial excitement will cause some to pay over sticker to be the first on their block to own one. When supply catches up to demand, the price will drop below sticker and then depreciation sets in. At some point the cars will bottom out in value (we may be close to that with the Gallardo if we haven't seen it already) and then slowly begin to rise for all but the heavily abused examples. The image and scarcity of Lamborghini will accelerate the desirability to own an older one, with the accompanying increase in value, much faster than the similar interest in higher volume cars like Mercedes or Corvette. As always, the special models will command higher prices. We're already seeing a premium for Superleggeras, Spyder Performantes, Balbonis and manuals that will only widen in the future. But even the base cars will continue to appreciate. The least desirable Ferrari of the 1960s, the rather pedestrian 250 GTE, will still set you back over $300K today for a good one. Granted, that's a time horizon beyond 10-20 years, but it is a valid example. I saw an absolutely perfect GTE sell for $2900 in 1971 when it was 8 years old. It was probably another 8-10 years before the value started to climb noticeably, but by the mid-1980s those were $50K cars. This is just one example of the bottom-of-the-barrel model of an exotic whose value climbed as it's more famous stablemates commanded higher prices. Yes, it is a Ferrari, so the rise is probably higher than normal. But the point is that the rise has been there, is still there and will be there for rare, exotic cars that enthusiasts love to own.
 

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Add thirty years to the model year, thats how long it takes for people who wanted a car in their youth to start wanting to relive their childhood and have the means to do so. The ones that will draw the premium dollars will be the mostly original ones that are in overall good shape and don't have a crazy amount of miles for the age.
 

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Exotics that seem to appreciate at some point also seem to have been produced in far lower numbers. There are a **** ton of gallardos out there! Seriously, if wikipedia is right, there's fourteen thousand of them. This is why I'd be lucky to clear $99k for my $265k '06 today. Ferrari 360 was produced in similar numbers, and they're well below $100k on ebay unless it's a stradale, where now you're in a more exclusive 1000-made club. The Gallardo is also not exactly a timeless sexy car like the Murci and Diablo, or 360 / 430, etc. I think it still looks great, but the rear end is very blocky / 2000's-era, especially with those big vertical bars to the sides of center. My Murci has a butt I could look at all day long even at 18 years old, Gallardo, I'm more like she's alright lol.
 

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As far as production numbers, 14k is scarce, when you consider they made like 14 million Corollas so far, lol and not all of those 14k are still around and not all of them are in the US or in good condition, with lower miles and no accidents, etc. You start chopping away at those and you don't have 14k, you have much less.

But even rarity doesn't really matter, they made close to 19k NSXs over 15 years. It sold for far, far, far less than Gs when new. It's now selling for more than many G with the equal miles.
Same for Supras (which had probably 40k worldwide numbers), now some of them are also selling for equal to or more than some Gs.

These cars will always have their time, but even though I've seen prices going up in the past 2 years (and definitely not as low as it was 4 years ago for preLPs), there's still a lot more room. Just need time. 2004-05 are already seeing climbs from previous lows. 06 is coming up too... and 07-08 will probably be this year or next, in earnest.
 

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944 turbo 25K made have gone up 50-60% in value over the last 5 years as people who are now looking to spend disposable income and purchase their poster cars move into the market. As far as the Gallardo goes, the non standard ones (SE, Nera, Superleggera, Performante, Balboni, Super Trofeo, Super Trofeo Stradale) will see the largest increase in value as will the manual trans units.
 

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944 turbo 25K made have gone up 50-60% in value over the last 5 years as people who are now looking to spend disposable income and purchase their poster cars move into the market. As far as the Gallardo goes, the non standard ones (SE, Nera, Superleggera, Performante, Balboni, Super Trofeo, Super Trofeo Stradale) will see the largest increase in value as will the manual trans units.
You forgot the 50TH ANNIVERSARY cars. ;)
 

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These are exotic automobiles of limited production, albeit the Gallardo with 14,400 in total production. I don鈥檛 care what metrics you want to put out there they will be going up in value starting from here just simply because of age and as others have said the dreams of so many. For me, the Gallardo has timeless angles and has always been one of my favorite Lamborghini productions. Long story short, these cars have depreciated to almost their bottom probably their bottom, and will be flat to increasing from here for good condition unaltered moderately low mileage vehicles.
 

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Many interesting and insightful comments but with these cars, at this stage in my life, I live in the now and 20+ years hence is not a big concern. Though, I enjoy the discussion from an academic perspective.
 

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Even in a world where gas powered cars were the future, I would expect exotic gas powered cars to appreciate. The fact that the automotive industry will be going through a revolution over the next 20-50 years and driving will essentially become automated, I fully expect modern day gas powered exotics to appreciate regardless of their production numbers. That being said, these cars are not investment grade instruments, youre money will go alot further elsewhere if thats what you are prioritizing.
 

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I agree with what has been said. And along the lines of how many were produced...you take the 14k produced, and slowly whittle away at that number with wrecks, mechanical failures, fires, floods, etc. over the course of 30 years and there will be few nice examples left, supply<<demand. I think the pre-LP G depreciation bottomed out about 3 years ago and is beginning to appreciate now. Not saying it's going to be worth 200k next year or something, but that the market is stable and good examples will maintain value or rise slightly (~5-10%) over the next few years. LP Gs are just about at the bottom but I don't think they're quite there yet. Obviously all just my opinion but I have been watching G prices since I first started looking for mine about 5 years ago.
 
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