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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

I bought my dream car, a matte black Huracan. 6 months later I damaged the wrap and had it removed. What I found underneath was heartbreaking, scratches and paint damage all over the car not to mention an entirely bare front wing with filler in the paint.

I contacted the garage immediately (a highly reputable dealer in the UK) they assured me these kinds of things happen when you dont use a professional (I had).

Nothing showed up on a HPI check about a collision at the time of purchase but I have recently found proof that it was in fact declared a CAT D write off which explains why the VIN was blocked on the Lamborghini system.

I contacted Lamborghini Italy to try and access the files on the car, but they won’t release them to me? Is this standard? Can anybody help me access important information to help win a court case on this car?

Thanks for any help.

183D3103-DD8E-4228-9BBC-75854BCBC649.jpeg
 

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I have no idea how things work in the UK, I just think it is interesting you found pics of the car with the damage. It looks like the air bag went off. So when you talk of Cat D and HPI, I have no idea what that is. Now Carfax and salvage title, that I understand. If the dealer presented the car as clean(no accidents) and you found this, then yes, lawyer up.
 

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The UK used to classify damaged cars as

A, B, C and D although this has now changed. The damage title is recorded on the log book you get with the car (so a bit like a car fax)
A = Crush only
B = Major damage, parts only can never be returned to the road
C = Insurance declined the repair due to level of damage but can be repaired (usually heavy damage / flood etc)
D = repairable but the insurance declined the repair (but is repairable) due to the overall cost. This would happen if parts are delayed, the repair will take weeks and hire car costs etc would all make not cost effective to repair.

Its a bit different now, this being S for structural but repairable (used to be C) NS no structural but repairable (used to be cat D)

However not all cars go though the insurance and although damaged have no listing. It can also take months for the write off title to catch up with the car, so you could by from auction with no title and then one show.

If its Cat D it should show up on the log book and I would go back to the garage purchased from as its been miss sold. It is is just damaged and repaired (although badly) and not listed maybe a little more hard work but I would say you will still have grounds.

I have seen cars that the difference between a repair authorised and a repair write off being a little a a few hundred pounds as the system is basically automated. There are many cars out there that have been damaged are repaired by the insurance with no title.
 

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I would contact the dealer I bought it from and ask them to buy it back. They have no leg to stand on, they are suppose to be professionals. If they are a good dealer, they will buy it back and go back on where they got it from. Just my .02 worth.
 

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2021 Huracan EVO RWD Spyder Verde Themis
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That is shame, never heard of this before now. Sure do wish the best getting it sorted.
 

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Heartwrenching...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you for your comments and best wishes.

I immediately asked to be refunded but I was told very rudely where to go. Now the images have surfaced and been added to the cars online history, they have offered to reimburse 60% for the car back... I refused as I think my case is stronger than that.

I am looking for a way to access the information Lamborghini won’t provide me as I am told this will strengthen my case no end. Please get in touch if you can help locate this kind of thing.
 

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An attorney can get the records for you. You should get 100% if your money plus expenses if they did not disclose this to you. Even if they had no knowledge, they can go back on who misrepresented the car to them. I would not drive the car but give them one more chance then get an attorney
 

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Throwing out a couple thoughts.

- Get legal advice if things don't work out soon. I don't know the laws in your country, but letters from lawyers tend to get things moving in your favor pretty quick in my neighborhood. Going to court to settle a dispute is an expensive and time consuming headache for the dealer. If the law is on your side, a short letter from legal representation stating your position might cause a quick solution. The threat of getting a lawyer and taking legal action may be all it takes.

- Trial by internet. What happened to you is most buyer's worst nightmare. If you start posting on social media and include those pictures and the name of the dealer, I imagine it would completely destroy the seller's reputation. I am sure they are aware of this and that is why you made headway after posting pictures. Those pictures are shocking and I imagine the story would take off if it got the chance. Your local news would probably enjoy using the story.
 

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Really sorry to hear this. I second Mike A.

Get an attorney and whatever costs associated with them representing you can ask to be included in your settlement.

I am in the US and had something similar happen. I bought a 2013 G35 Coupe with a salvage title and all damage was disclosed in the paperwork prior to purchase. After getting the mechanical parts repaired it was sent to the body shop and they noticed the frame was bent. This was one of the first questions I asked when inquiring about the car and they ensured me there was no frame damage. Long story short, the dealer wrote me a check for the amount I paid + what I put into the car + a little extra for the trouble. Thankfully I didn’t have to get an attorney.

Your situation is different - location, value of the car, etc. but I would definitely find an attorney.

As a side note, I just went through some legal defense stuff with my business and I highly recommend speaking/interviewing a few different attorneys before deciding who to work with. I was eager to start so I hired someone quickly. If I had done my research it would’ve ended up saving me time and money. It’s probably going to take some time but if you stay diligent you should have a favorable outcome.

Hoping for the best for you, keep us updated.
 

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Sorry to hear about your problems. I would get an attorney immediately. Obviously the car was misrepresented to you and it should have been disclosed. Find a good attorney that has experience in this type of litigation. It will not be cheap. Do not hire your brother in law or the friend of a friend. Spend some time finding the right attorney with a good track record. It makes a world of difference. You do not have to hire a large law firm just a very competent civil trial lawyer. Forget the ones that advertise a lot and personal injury lawyers.They are usually just looking for a quick buck. Have the attorney send a demand letter requesting the dealership to buy the car back. Make it clear that if they do not buy back the car that you will proceed with litigation. Often it is a matter of cost versus trouble to a dealership. Put their name out everywhere and document what they did to you. Also there may be something like the better business bureau in the UK. If so file a complaint with them. It is usually free. The more trouble you become for the dealer, the more likely they will make it right. Be absolutely factual in your statements about them. You do not want to give them grounds for a countersuit. Most countries have pretty strong laws to protect consumers from unscrupulous sellers so your chances are probably pretty good. Be prepared to spend 10 to 30k to get your money back. Good litigation is not cheap. It is possible that you can recover multiple and punitive damages if they knowingly misrepresented the car to you. In the US it can be triple the amount of the loss or more. You will usually have to prove they cheated you on purpose to recover punitive damages. I dont know how the legal system works there but much of the US legal system was based upon English law. Good luck . Keep us posted. Lee
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks guys some good advice there I really appreciate it.

I wish i had seeked help here sooner, I have already paid one lawyer 10k and sacked him after he tried to charge 2k for a 2hr zoom call. My new lawyer comes highly recommended so fingers crossed he’s also not out to shaft me. The dealership have stated their position clearly and they aren’t willing to cooperate any further than their offer.

I agree Ohlgren, as much as I would enjoy slandering them on social media, will it help my case? I’m afraid things might get messy. They are very well known in the UK and this would do serious damage to their reputation. It is nonsensical to me that they are willing to fight this.
 

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Lawyer is the right first step. I would take his advice over mine.

I would use social media as a last resort and be very careful about it. Once you go that route, there is no going back and no undoing it. Based on the little you have shown us, I would be terrified of a public scenario if I was them.

Wish you the best and good luck.
 

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Who's the dealer? Car is probably an ex rental.
 

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This situation brings up an interesting issue. What if someone bought a wrapped car and owned it for years, then sells it to a new owner who unwraps it and finds damage underneath the wrap. The seller had no idea and now is involved in a sticky situation. I can see the owner that sold the car not being aware if they never unwrapped the car. With that said, we as dealers have insurance for just this situation. It is possible (giving dealer benefit of doubt) that they had no idea. But they should buy the car back and turn into their insurance carrier or go after the place they obtained the car from for compensation or to buy it back. Usually these deals unwind backwards until it hits the individual that had knowledge. I cannot imagine any dealer turning down your request unless there was discussion about said damage or the consumer signed something saying AS-IS and even with that, a GOOD dealer, which this one has had a good reputation, should do what is right. I tell all my staff,"each client should be treated as it is you mother". Do what is right and avoid what is wrong.
 

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Yea, no.

You don't buy a car with a wrap on it - ever.
Obviously something can be underneath and this is no surprise.

My guess is the car was bought very cheap and was an ex rental that didn't have a PPI.
 

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I agree with LA brit. I NEVER buy cars with wrap other than clear. Too easy to hide flaws. However that doesnt help when you are already in the crapper. Just find out from the attorney what you can do on social media without compromising your case. Be real careful what you say. A friend of mine got Jail time for trashing a gay guy on social media that screwed him over and did not pay him. He did say some pretty funny stuff. Probably was not that funny when they arrested him. These days words have consequences so caution is the word of the day. Lee
 
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