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Hello, this is my first ever post on this forum. I'm not a Lambo owner, just a huge fan.

Well, let's get to the point. I'm just curious how is it possible for cars like Aventador (or F12Berlinetta) to still have naturally aspirated engines (and I'm very glad they do) that aren't exactly economical with all those CO2 emissions while so many other manufactures (e.g. Pagani with Huayra) are going down the turbo route to keep in line with the new emission regulations? Don't they have the same rules?

I'm just curious if anyone knows how come. I just hope this thread isn't too boring :)
 

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The normally aspirated V12 engine has always been Lamborghini's thing. (Since 1963)

They have to meet emission standards just like every other car. They do so by tuning and managing the engine and exhaust for acceptable emissions.

The newer Aventador cars will run on 6 cylinders for better emissions and fuel consumption when cruising.

Why do they do they keep the V12? Because there are a lot of people out there who want something more exciting than a Prius. The power and performance is there when you want it. A V12 engine has an amazingly smooth delivery of power. The V12 engine pushes the car forcefully from just above idle all the way to red line. Turbo systems need to spool up, often have a delay, and a different way of delivering power. Nothing against them, but
turbo has never been the Lamborghini style.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thanks for responses. Ohlgren, as I said I'm very happy they have stuck with a V12, I was just wondering how is it possible for such engines to meet regulations. Pagani claims that those standards couldn't be met if they used a naturally aspirated V12 with the Huayra and that was what inspired me to ask this question. :)

But how come even MUCH less powerful cars such as Honda Civic Type-R had to go out of production because of the new rules and will now be replaced with successors with turbos? It just doesn't make sense to me how a 200bhp is too powerful and a 700bhp Lambo isn't.
 

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Enjoy V12's while they last, because they won't. Look for a damn hybrid in the future, or a battery powered sterile appliance. Old cars look better all the time.
 

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Thanks for responses. Ohlgren, as I said I'm very happy they have stuck with a V12, I was just wondering how is it possible for such engines to meet regulations. Pagani claims that those standards couldn't be met if they used a naturally aspirated V12 with the Huayra and that was what inspired me to ask this question. :)

But how come even MUCH less powerful cars such as Honda Civic Type-R had to go out of production because of the new rules and will now be replaced with successors with turbos? It just doesn't make sense to me how a 200bhp is too powerful and a 700bhp Lambo isn't.
Lamborghini has said that they will only deal with naturally aspirated engines (in large part) simply because NA is a "pure" engine and therefore a "pure" driving experience. Also ALL flagship models will ALWAYS be V12's, that's just what defines Lamborghini for what it is. Although with the times what they are now, either they will have to build bigger engines, or mount an additional electric motor (La Ferrari) to maintain the growth in HP consumers demand (and stay NA).

As for Honda's and such, they have to meet stricter standards as production volumes are much higher, and so are sales. Now car companies in the US have to maintain company-wide mpg averages (so if you sell alot of Civic's, their mpg will have a large impact on the company-wide average mpg). Adding small turbos can actually boost mpg if done right (as the fuel will combust fully and at hotter temperatures) (ex: BMW 328i is no longer an inline 6, instead it is now an inline 4 with a twin-scrolling turbo that gets better mpg) If you add too large a turbo you will actually decrease mpg. Also small companies like Honda can't afford to build bigger engines, so turbocharges are the perfect solution in boosting HP while staying on the same platform.
 

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Lamborghini has said that they will only deal with naturally aspirated engines (in large part) simply because NA is a "pure" engine and therefore a "pure" driving experience. Also ALL flagship models will ALWAYS be V12's, that's just what defines Lamborghini for what it is. Although with the times what they are now, either they will have to build bigger engines, or mount an additional electric motor (La Ferrari) to maintain the growth in HP consumers demand (and stay NA).

As for Honda's and such, they have to meet stricter standards as production volumes are much higher, and so are sales. Now car companies in the US have to maintain company-wide mpg averages (so if you sell alot of Civic's, their mpg will have a large impact on the company-wide average mpg). Adding small turbos can actually boost mpg if done right (as the fuel will combust fully and at hotter temperatures) (ex: BMW 328i is no longer an inline 6, instead it is now an inline 4 with a twin-scrolling turbo that gets better mpg) If you add too large a turbo you will actually decrease mpg. Also small companies like Honda can't afford to build bigger engines, so turbocharges are the perfect solution in boosting HP while staying on the same platform.
So we need the help of an electric motor to gain useless extra horsepower? Something not right there.
 

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Pagani claims that those standards couldn't be met if they used a naturally aspirated V12 with the Huayra and that was what inspired me to ask this question.
I suspect this is where your problem is. Pagani doesn't design or make engines whereas Lamborghini does. Obviously the Pagani "claim" is erroneous and I suspect Mercedes would not agree either.

Downsizing an engine and adding a turbo is simply one method of achieving emissions needs while maintaining HP (due to the recovery of the normally lost exhaust energy) but that doesn't imply that the emission standards can't be met otherwise - with Lamborghini as the poster child for that fact.

-****
 

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I suspect this is where your problem is. Pagani doesn't design or make engines whereas Lamborghini does. Obviously the Pagani "claim" is erroneous and I suspect Mercedes would not agree either.

Downsizing an engine and adding a turbo is simply one method of achieving emissions needs while maintaining HP (due to the recovery of the normally lost exhaust energy) but that doesn't imply that the emission standards can't be met otherwise - with Lamborghini as the poster child for that fact.

-****
Lamborghini... The poster child for economy and emissions standards!



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