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2011 LP560-4 Spyder / Blu Fontus
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4 points worse than 93?
:LOL: :ROFLMAO: -- Yeah, but that's a valid question though..... As a creature of habit I use 93 because everything else I drive uses some form of Forced Induction. Being Naturally Aspirated would make the compression ratio dictate the required octane rating...... so probably some simple goo goo ling would answer that.........
 
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OP please don’t take offense, Im not trying to be rude but I never understood why owners ask this. You’re driving an expensive car, run the higher octane. Depending on how the manufacturer tuned the car, or if it’s forced inducted, then the higher octane helps with pre-detonation. Why risk running a lower octane?
 
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Yep, running higher octane is like upgrading your insurance policy. How many times have we heard bitching about blown head gaskets and find out the owner doesn't understand the concept of premium fuel................ I'll leave it at that, if someone else wants to expand, now's the time to jump in cause Ima gonna go jump in the pool right about now ❗
 

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The higher the Octane the better (that's available at the gas station) - when I accidentally used the lower octane in my 2004 Gallardo, BOY COULD I TELL THE DIFFERENCE - if you can afford a Lambo - surely you can afford to put the best "food" into it.
 

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From personal experience in my LP640 (Yes, I know the OP has a Gallardo) blending 110 octane with 92 octane (max I can find in my State, plus we have 10% Ethanol) makes a noticeable difference in power. You can blend it however you choose....5 gallons of 110 to 15 gallons of 92 for example would equal about 97 octane.
 

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From personal experience in my LP640 (Yes, I know the OP has a Gallardo) blending 110 octane with 92 octane (max I can find in my State, plus we have 10% Ethanol) makes a noticeable difference in power. You can blend it however you choose....5 gallons of 110 to 15 gallons of 92 for example would equal about 97 octane.
The only "Noticable" difference is going to be your engine possibly running smoother on higher octane fuel but it's not going to make any more power just because you put in some 110 octane. As for 110 Octane, lets hope your not running leaded racing fuel or avgas at a 30% mixture...
 

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Re-read my post. Not leaded. And your wrong but I have no desire to waste time trying to convince you.
You don't need to waste time trying to convince me because just adding higher octane fuel doesn't make more power all things being equal. And I don't need to re-read your post, I read it correctly the first time.
 

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I'd advise against going above 93 if not putting in a car that calls for that. It does not add power, "smoothness" or any other perceived difference, and it will cause the engine to run warmer than it otherwise would have. If you want "premium" for the cleaning agents, etc. great, but there's no OEM Lambo that requires over 93, even the Urus; non-OEM like a aftermarket turbo'd, etc. combined with ECU tune, of course, but not factory. I've been at countless track driving events where owner cars are allowed on track and people inevitably put 98, 103, or whatever the highest non-ethanol unleaded octane the track has to get "more power" and next thing you know they're exiting a session early because of overheat issues.

If you can find a 91/93 non-ethanol premium, that is ideal. Unfortunately where I'm at all the non-ethanol pumps are 89 and I think at least one of my cars calls for 91+, perhaps both (03 murci / 06 G), so I would not run 89 unless a small amount in a pinch to get me to a better gas station.
 

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Lower than recommended octane can cause pre-ignition and therefore reduce power if the pre ignition is happening.


"As its name implies, pre-ignition happens when an engine ignites fuel sooner than it should – in other words, before the spark plugs have fired. As a result, the engine produces a significantly reduced amount of power. If allowed to persist long enough, pre-ignition can lead to damage inside of the engine."
 

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o_O Wait, you are saying a car tuned for 93 will perform better if you use a higher octane?

 

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Cheap gas in either a high compression, Turbo or Supercharged car will cause detonation. Even if you cant hear it its doing damage. I have fixed many because people were being cheap. It eats valves and or pistons or both.
 

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To anyone who feels like the entire design of your engine revolved around limiting it to 93 octane (Really? It's a factor of course but not the key component) then you'll probably dismiss this article and others like it as well. Is Premium Gas Worth It? We Test High Octane on 4 Popular Vehicles Why not just try the higher octane and see if you can tell a difference? If it doesn't affect your performance for the better you're only out the cost of the pricier fuel. This thread has more lovers and haters for you to consider.
 

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To anyone who feels like the entire design of your engine revolved around limiting it to 93 octane (Really? It's a factor of course but not the key component) then you'll probably dismiss this article and others like it as well. Is Premium Gas Worth It? We Test High Octane on 4 Popular Vehicles Why not just try the higher octane and see if you can tell a difference? If it doesn't affect your performance for the better you're only out the cost of the pricier fuel. This thread has more lovers and haters for you to consider.
Yes these are good facts on every day cars and it gives you an idea. Your driving a race car actually with precise parts that are not cheap. You can use cheap gas but over the long haul it will eat things. Its called detonation and what do you think that detonation is doing. When you put a m80 on the ground what happens. It takes part of what it was in contact with away or makes a big hole. Do that a thousand times a million times. Yes most car computers will take timing away when knock is detected but barely. When you take away timing you lose horsepower. It can only take away so much. If anyone wants to see pics of what cheap gas does I have some pics of two different cars. I have more but can't remember where they are. Racing fuel is good for tuned cars that are modified to use it but stock cars will barely make a difference. Its a waste of money in my opinion. Do what it says in the manual or on the gas door.
 

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I have been a Mercury / Mercruiser boat mechanic for over 24 years. I also worked at Lamborghini USA as a tech in 91/92 .
For the boats, we recommend that you run the suggested octane fuel for for your motor. We are told that a higher octane rating does not produce higher performance. It is suggested that you avoid using a lower octane fuel if possible as HP can be reduced due to pre-ignition / detonation as mentioned above. The Verado line of outboards ( Supercharged, inline 4 or 6 cylinder, engineered with the cooperation of Porsche ) is the most prone to HP loss as it has knock sensors and will retard timing to eliminate the issue. It is also their higher performance units ranging in horsepower from 200 to 450.

In addition to the octane rating, we also recommend that you buy fuel from a "name brand" gas station. We prefer that you fill up at Mobil, Exxon, Shell instead of the local convenience store. Granted, the same trucking company supplies many of the facilities but the additives can be different between brands.

Using 110 octane in an unmodified engine rated for 91 octane is like a couch potato drinking Gatorade. It costs more that tap water but it does not provide any benifit.
 

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On a standard engine the below comment should be factual. On a high performance engine I would not take the chance.

"Using the wrong fuel would make the engine knock and possibly damage internal engine components. But today, engine control systems can compensate for low octane by adjusting ignition timing to avoid knocking."
 
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