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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New here to the board, and looking for info on a Miura purchase. Anyone have any experience with these cars? What im looking for specificaly is issues with driveability, reliability, and even safety. I have a 4 year old son, whom id sometimes drive with, and the idea of no airbags is an issue for me. Also brakes, how are these in relation to newer cars? And last but not least any info on any cars for sale? Fixer uppers considered also.

Thanks again
Bruce
 

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There was that just restored, award winning green Miura that was in the
Running of the Bulls (from what I hear, it did well on the run too which
means its very reliable) in August, that's in Washington State, that the
owner wants to sell. It is just BEAUTIFUL!! Does anyone have the details?
I can't remember the guys name. Sorry. Real nice guy. He was telling me
all about it. If someone knows who I am talking about (is he on this list?)
you could call him and talk to him. He's just done one and can fill you in.
Bob Wallace was involved in the restoration as well. The price didn't sound
unreasonable to me. But what do I know?
 

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I do. The Miura is a car from the 1960s - probably one of the very best from THAT era. However it must be excepted for what it is and the limits of the times; especially- suspension, tires. The power-wieght ratio is good and the looks are killer. Compared to the Countach it's a totaly different animal - also in order to be fast your driving stile must change completely. A few years ago the price level was acceptable - these last 2 years it has risen significantly. Mt 2 cents. Alex
 

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The guy scramjet is talking about has an AMAZING Miura. I think it was a decent price to...spectaculary restored and the guy takes impeccable care of it....I don't know of anyone that has his contact info - although my dad might. RoyToy2003....ask him he probably has the guys number.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Has anyone here owned a Miura? Is the Countach the better way to go? How is maintenence on them? Ive heard horror stories on the clutch.
 

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Bruce said:
But does anyone have any real world experience driving one?
I found the name of the guy I was talking about. There is a picture of him
driving his beautiful Miura on the cover of the October 2005, Hemmings
"Sports & Exotic Car" magazine. His name is David Gooley. Perhaps someone
can now find his contact info or maybe he's on the list here or somewhere.

To answer your question, as I said earlier, David drove his Miura in this
years Running of the Bulls and from what I hear it did well.
This means he really drove it on a 2 day excursion with other Lambos in
the middle of the summer, and these guys aren't tea tottlers!
As I said also, famed Lamborghini Miura development driver and legend,
Bob Wallace, helped restore the motor, from what David was telling me in
Monterey. David told me a lot about Miura restoration and ownership.
My radar is telling me this is a NICE example! But I am no Miura expert!
Just giving you a good lead to a guy that can help you out who also has a
real nice one for sale.

Larry
 

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Bruce,

I've had quite a bit of driving experience, including driving well over a hundred miles in one sitting. Highway driving, city driving, and twisty road driving.

As a matter of fact, the car I did the longest stretch of driving in was LTAdmin's beautiful Miura. It was driven in a hot and humid day and most of it was highway driving.

Your first question about the car: Driveability.
I don't know what your experience is with vintage cars, but if you are used to only modern cars I would say that the car is quite a handful.
The driving position is awkward for most, the clutch is heavy, and the shifter is sluggish. Creature comforts are unheard of and its quite possible to get a workout by driving in city streets.

The only thing modern about this car is it's acceleration. Brakes will give you quite a scare if you're only used to power brakes with abs. The suspension although communicative will not give you an indication of how close to the edge you are. I never bothered to push this aspect of the drive, mind you. The lights are quite dim in comparison to today's HID lights, the wipers leave a lot to be desired. Heater/defroster/ac...hahaha.

If you are used to vintage cars or have experience with them, the car is a remarkable drive. It handles surprisingly well, accelerates with vicious zest, and brakes hard. You feel the road quite well through the steering wheel and the steering is light and communicative at speed. I've driven a Corvette of similar vintage and the difference in steering/suspension is scary. The Lamborghini makes the Vette feel absolutely prehistoric. There was no dead spot on the steering, and suspension did not "float" for starters. There isn't a better driving vintage car out there under and in it's price range. For more exotic cars there are better drives, but you'll have to shell out considerable more money.

Next: Reliability.
I know a few Miura owners and am striving to be one. The key concensus seems to be preventive maintenance. If you're cheap about the upkeep of the car, it will punish you. Lavish it with care and it is bulletproof.

In one of my Miura outings I made the rookie mistake of leaving the fuel pump running while the car was parked. It almost flooded the car, but after we managed to start it, judicious use of the gas pedal clear up that problem. Other problem's I've encountered are dusty contacts in switches, making the headlights inoperable and such. Consistant use and flicking of the switch got rid of this problem. Keep in mind though, this was a VERY well sorted car.

Engine mechanicals I hear are quite capable of being used as daily drivers even. Again, owners who participate preventive maintenance seem to be the happiest owners. Beware the garage queen, they are not always the best. Also beware the fixer upper, the cost of getting the car on the road can exceed the value of the car. Not for the faint of heart or the light of wallet.

Finally: Safety.
These are vintage cars. 30-40 years old. These are NOT safe cars in the least in contemporary standards. Sure they are built quite well but they will not withstand an impact well in comparison to newer cars. This may put things in perspective. Even some of the most advanced cars of that time don't even meet the bare minimum safety standards of today's cars.

Forget bumpers. No crumple zones, no breakable engine mounts to drop the engine in severe impacts, no air bags, lap belts only, no whiplash protection seats, no crash designed chassis, no collapsible steering column, etc, etc, etc. Pick up a Mercedes Benz CL safety brochure and you'll see a listing of things this car does NOT have.

In my opinion, a 4 year old child should not be riding in a vintage car for anything other than extremely leisurely cruising. Too many things that can go wrong. Things are quite different if you rebuild the car from scratch. More than just a restoration. But even then, the car as it left the factory was not exactly a safe car.

That said, compared to it's contemporaries it very well may meet if not exceed their crashworthiness. This is all moot because if you are uncomfortable with driving without airbags the vintage car is not for you. Airbags are by namesake "Secondary" Restraint Systems. Vintage cars have suspect "Primary" restraints (read: seatbelts).

As for brakes, I mentioned it above. They are excellent for it's time. Compared to modern cars it's a joke. I never had any problems with the brakes in my city driving or in my very spirited freeway driving. I've driven from over 80 mph to 25 mph in a hurry. I hit over 100 mph and slowed to 15 mph to get off an exit. Both were quite uneventful, but required concentration, whereas in a modern car it would have been almost instinct. I'm sure you can get used to it though.

Based on the little you have said, I don't think the Miura is the right car for you. Maybe something more modern is a better fit.
 

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downdraft said:
I do. The Miura is a car from the 1960s - probably one of the very best from THAT era. However it must be excepted for what it is and the limits of the times; especially- suspension, tires. The power-wieght ratio is good and the looks are killer. Compared to the Countach it's a totaly different animal - also in order to be fast your driving stile must change completely. A few years ago the price level was acceptable - these last 2 years it has risen significantly. Mt 2 cents. Alex
just checked your file and your Countach is amazingly awesome, looks bran spanking new, and the spoiler is just so agressive....
 

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Bruce said:
Has anyone here owned a Miura? Is the Countach the better way to go? How is maintenence on them? Ive heard horror stories on the clutch.
I have personal experience working on Miuras as a friend of mine owns one and drives it on a regular basis. The car from my expericence is reliable but delicate. It's a really drivable car in the sense that you can just drive with no worries as to cooling or anything like that. In the durability sense its a little on the lack luster side. The car from a repairs and maintenance stand point is very straight forward then again me and my friend work on the car more than anyone else. If you have any specific questions PM me and if I am at a lost my friend can help you. Good luck and be safe.
 
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