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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I drove very sharply and quickly on the motorway. Suddenly eGear warning lights. Vehicle rolled out and parked. Bonnet up and smoke and oil everywhere. Examined at home and the complete eGear hydraulic oil is missing. I can't find a leak quickly. I have to fill up hydraulic oil and check where it is leaking.

What can I do to find the leak?

Question:
Does the eGear have to be vented with LaRa or can I simply fill up with oil up to the max.


thanks


295117


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Having just lived through this myself, I found it helpful to get the car up in the air, remove the plate underneath the transaxle, and remove the right rear wheel and wheel well splash guard. This allowed easy access and visualization to the heat shield covering the egear fluid reservoir. Remove the heat shield on the egear reservoir. See my previous post for a picture.

Fill up the reservoir with pentosin CHF and open the driver door to get the pump to turn on. Look underneath the car for leaks. It’s a high-pressure system so the leaks are pretty obvious. It is best to put the battery on a trickle charger as you may need to run the pump a few times. Do not let the reservoir run dry.

After correcting the leak you need to bleed the system and there is a bleeder valve on top of the transaxle underneath the air cleaner. The manual states that you have to remove the air cleaner to access it but this is not correct. I think I used a small 5/16 inch wrench to crack the bleeder valve open. Also be aware that egear fluid is flammable and needs to be cleaned thoroughly before you run the car again.

If one of your egear lines is broken then you should remove that egear line and bring it to a hydraulic repair place to make a new one. I can’t imagine spending $6000 for all four hoses from Italy. But to each his own I guess.

Oddly, my leak was a loose egear accumulator under the pump. I thought it was broken but somehow it just loosened up. Even if it was broken, apparently that accumulator is used on Fiats and some other cars and it’s not that expensive as long as you don’t buy directly from Lamborghini. I reattached it and used a little bit of thread sealing tape (the kind made for fuel / chemicals).

Unfortunately I had bring it a shop anyhow to have it bled properly using LARA and also resynch shift points using the LARA system. Apparently it is hard to completely bleed it manually. I think the shop actually uses the knock off system (can’t remember the name) but it does many of the same tasks as LARA. I wish I owned one but I don’t.
 

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Having just lived through this myself, I found it helpful to get the car up in the air, remove the plate underneath the transaxle, and remove the right rear wheel and wheel well splash guard. This allowed easy access and visualization to the heat shield covering the egear fluid reservoir. Remove the heat shield on the egear reservoir. See my previous post for a picture.

Fill up the reservoir with pentosin CHF and open the driver door to get the pump to turn on. Look underneath the car for leaks. It’s a high-pressure system so the leaks are pretty obvious. It is best to put the battery on a trickle charger as you may need to run the pump a few times. Do not let the reservoir run dry.

After correcting the leak you need to bleed the system and there is a bleeder valve on top of the transaxle underneath the air cleaner. The manual states that you have to remove the air cleaner to access it but this is not correct. I think I used a small 5/16 inch wrench to crack the bleeder valve open. Also be aware that egear fluid is flammable and needs to be cleaned thoroughly before you run the car again.

If one of your egear lines is broken then you should remove that egear line and bring it to a hydraulic repair place to make a new one. I can’t imagine spending $6000 for all four hoses from Italy. But to each his own I guess.

Oddly, my leak was a loose egear accumulator under the pump. I thought it was broken but somehow it just loosened up. Even if it was broken, apparently that accumulator is used on Fiats and some other cars and it’s not that expensive as long as you don’t buy directly from Lamborghini. I reattached it and used a little bit of thread sealing tape (the kind made for fuel / chemicals).

Unfortunately I had bring it a shop anyhow to have it bled properly using LARA and also resynch shift points using the LARA system. Apparently it is hard to completely bleed it manually. I think the shop actually uses the knock off system (can’t remember the name) but it does many of the same tasks as LARA. I wish I owned one but I don’t.
You shouldnt need LARA for anything but setting up when replacing clutch or checking clutch snap.
I replaced the hose from the bleeder on the quick release fitting near the accumulator to the bottom of the gearbox and just run the engine while leaving a clear hose connected to the bleeder and hung it into the Egear reserviour.
I have never had an issue from doing it that way.
And to reset the shift points dont you just pull back on both paddles and hold until the dash Egear lamp comes on and then release the paddles?
I do this regularly as mentioned by others on here and have great shifts.
 

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You shouldnt need LARA for anything but setting up when replacing clutch or checking clutch snap.
I replaced the hose from the bleeder on the quick release fitting near the accumulator to the bottom of the gearbox and just run the engine while leaving a clear hose connected to the bleeder and hung it into the Egear reserviour.
I have never had an issue from doing it that way.
And to reset the shift points dont you just pull back on both paddles and hold until the dash Egear lamp comes on and then release the paddles?
I do this regularly as mentioned by others on here and have great shifts.
Did all that to no avail. Even ran a full liter of new Pentosin through the system and out the bleeder using a snug fitting clear hose.

I’ve been working on cars and building / restoring motorcycles from bare frames for 20+ years. Fix, weld, machine, paint, tube, wire, plumb, etc myself. Pretty handy for a non professional and I can tell you there was air in the system that I could not purge without a computer.

The car was on my 2 post lift. In retrospect maybe I should have tried tilting it nose or tail up on jack stands to see if the air would move toward the bleeder valve? The system did pressurize when I was done and I could “shift” through all 6 gears and neutral (it made noises and the dash indicated each gear) but it was actually between gears. If it were an old Harley it would be as if the shift forks were out of alignment.

I tried the soft reset (holding both paddles back) several times and it went through the cycle on the dash but didn’t make a difference. My very competent local indie shop foreman confirmed that this was an issue of air that had to be purged and the trans had to “relearn” the shift points. The R tronic manual explicitly mentions this as well. Anyhow that was my experience. It was the first time I had to start taking stuff apart on a Lambo and it really was good to get over any anxiety about messing with it.
 

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Could be leaking from the actuator, through the black end cap - or at the hose fittings where they are crimped. If hoses, get them made at a hydraulic shop. Stainless braided teflon with the low profile fittings, well under $100 each. Remove the rear bumper, exhaust in preparation and then clean up everything. Fill, turn on to prime the pump, and shift a few gears. May not show leak unless shifting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok, thanks for your answers. It's hard for me to understand what you mean.

I have to work with google translator and it is difficult.

I still face the problem and ask for help.

If it's one of the lines, does the complete set cost around 6,000 US dollars for all four hoses ?
I can have lines repaired.
What kind of accumulator should be under the car?
Where is the vent valve? Does anyone have any photos?
Where can the liquid still escape? Photos ?

Thank you and greetings from Germany.
 

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Once you have the rear bumper and exhaust removed and everything cleaned up, attempt some shifts with the ignition on, engine off, foot on brake, and shift with the paddles to find the leak. You might consider removing the actuator from the transmission leaving all hoses connected and having someone else shift while holding the actuator in your hand to see where it is leaking - careful not to hold where the shift fingers are under the actuator. Do not let the pump run dry. I am going to guess it is leaking from the end of your actuator and thus an internal seal has failed, otherwise at one of the crimped ends of the five high pressure hoses to the actuator. It should only cost a few hundred US dollars to replace the hoses at a hydraulics shop. A leaking actuator will have to be rebuilt or replaced. HiTech and GTE rebuild these.
 

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Ok, thanks for your answers. It's hard for me to understand what you mean.

I have to work with google translator and it is difficult.

I still face the problem and ask for help.

If it's one of the lines, does the complete set cost around 6,000 US dollars for all four hoses ?
I can have lines repaired.
What kind of accumulator should be under the car?
Where is the vent valve? Does anyone have any photos?
Where can the liquid still escape? Photos ?

Thank you and greetings from Germany.
Do not buy genuine hoses - yes, VERY expensive!
Get new hoses made from a hose doctor of whatever you have in Germany.
Remove the right rear wheel and the plastic cover above it carefully - the covers cost around $1000 each too!
When you remove the plastic cover you will see the accumulator and solenoids and hoses.
What vent valve?
The "fluid" can "leak" from anywhere there is a seal or connection, it is very high pressure.
I will look for some pictures for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the feedback. Yes, if it's the hoses, I'll go to a specialty shop. But I don't know whether the hoses are leaking or the actuator itself. It's difficult for me to find out.

To bleed I only have to open this valve (like with the brake caliper)?

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Can it be that plastic lid?
Most of this is hydraulic fluid.
I don't think that if the line were to leak, the oil would collect there under the cover.

There are companies that repair these actuators and use metal caps instead of plastic caps. That should be a reason and weak point.



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The black plastic piece is nothing more than a dust cap. If removed it would expose the ends of the shift rods. If fluid is leaking from there then the orings for the shift rods are bad.

Can it be that plastic lid?
Most of this is hydraulic fluid.
I don't think that if the line were to leak, the oil would collect there under the cover.

There are companies that repair these actuators and use metal caps instead of plastic caps. That should be a reason and weak point.




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Yes.
I attached a clear plastic hose to the bleeder and put the other end of the hose into the reservoir then start the engine.
This circulates and bleeds the fluid so long as there is enough fluid in the reservoir.
You could put the end of the hose into a separate container, start the engine and keep filling the reservoir with new fluid to fully flush the fluid and bleed it too.
I hope I dont need to tell you to "open" the bleeder screw to get the fluid flowing?
You would be surprised at some peoples inept to carry out the simple things.
 

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That looks like a hose has started leaking to me.
Its a problem with the hoses, they get hard and crack rather than bend.
You could remove them - take lots of pictures and mark them for refitment - and get them tested for leaks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The strange thing is when I let the pump motor run (I open the driver's door). Then the pump runs continuously but no liquid comes out (the valve is open).
The liquid in the reservoir does not decrease either.

The existing leak may cause problems. I have to fix that, of course. But I thought, that's how I see exactly where it's going. I do not find the leak.

Actuator or hoses. I dont know.
One of the two is to blame.

Can I take out the actuator simply by removing the 8 screws and the lines?
Do I have to pay attention to something about the shift forks?

Thanks
 

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The strange thing is when I let the pump motor run (I open the driver's door). Then the pump runs continuously but no liquid comes out (the valve is open).
The liquid in the reservoir does not decrease either.

The existing leak may cause problems. I have to fix that, of course. But I thought, that's how I see exactly where it's going. I do not find the leak.

Actuator or hoses. I dont know.
One of the two is to blame.

Can I take out the actuator simply by removing the 8 screws and the lines?
Do I have to pay attention to something about the shift forks?

Thanks
You will only get a leak from a suspect hose when you put the car into gear.
That is when pressure is applied to the actuator to change gear.
When you are in NEUTRAL the fluid just recirculates in the system.
I wouldnt go near the actuator without some kind of knowledge with the system.
It may be wise to let an expert check this out.
 

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The strange thing is when I let the pump motor run (I open the driver's door). Then the pump runs continuously but no liquid comes out (the valve is open).
The liquid in the reservoir does not decrease either.

The existing leak may cause problems. I have to fix that, of course. But I thought, that's how I see exactly where it's going. I do not find the leak.

Actuator or hoses. I dont know.
One of the two is to blame.

Can I take out the actuator simply by removing the 8 screws and the lines?
Do I have to pay attention to something about the shift forks?

Thanks
Yes the actuator comes off easily, just make sure the transmission is in neutral. Here is a YouTube video of actuator removal that's very helpful:
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
we found the leak. It is directly at the connection from the hose. As it stands, it was screwed incorrectly when changing the clutch last year (crooked). Then at some point the hose suffered and is leaking.
I'm going to have this hose repaired in a hydraulics shop.
I still have to remove the hoses. Hope this isn't that bad.
Thanks @ all user !

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I had my leak the same way. You need to minimize the bend on the hoses and there is usually going to be some bend just to fit into the car. The shop will likely make a whole new hose, and you need those low profile fittings and teflon hose - no rubber.
 
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