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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What can I say, I thought I wanted a Viper, but I am just drawn to the Diablo. Looking to spend in the 100k range +/- a little.

So it looks like an early 90's 5.7l is the ballpark I am in.

But I have a few questions.

#1 - What are the service issues with the earlier Diablos? I read something about the oil pump?

#2 - I really enjoy working on my own cars, I have owned a couple of race cars, and built them from the ground up. I think I would like to stick to the 2wd since it doesn't seem that complex, and from what I see, routine maintenence looks to be somewhat easy. Am I wrong about this?

#3 - How is the clutch so fragile? I hear of owners changing them with as little as 9k miles? Is there some sort of design flaw, or issue with the clutch that it fails this quickly? It is a single disc clutch, and from the pictures I have seen it appears to be just as ordinary as any other car with a manual trans.

#4 - Can I get parts for the 5.7 or will I have to make all the replacement parts on my own?

I intend on driving this thing every chance I get. I don't really want an attention whore that needs $5k in parts after every trip through the state parks. If it will be in the shop more than it is on the road, then maybe it's not the car for me.

Again, I have no experience with the Italian cars, and no one I know has owned anything as exotic.

Thanks again hope to join the family soon.

MJB
 

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Holy Smokes Batman...my typing finger is going to be numb! ;)

Early Diablos are great! Yes they had a few issues just like any exotic Supercar. They are not free or easy to own! However, !!!!, if you are a passionate car nut like most of us here, there is almost nothing that can compare to the feeling of owning your own LAMBORGHINI! The Look, The Sound, The Feel!! There is just something (many things) about a Lamborghini that almost no other car has ever had or ever will!!
 

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Wow.. you are asking a number of "starting from scratch" questions... try my comments only for starters....

1) The cam chain tensioner was the biggie in a 1991.

2) Very basic maintenance is somewhat easy. The difference between a 2WD and AWD would add nothing from a do-it-at-home perspective. I would not view pulling engines, changing clutches or working on the transmission as routine/basic maintenance. I would suggest that you need a lift.

3) Good question. The clutches seem very susceptible to being "ridden" from a start or crappy down/up shifting. Avoid doing that (learn the tricks) and you should be in good shape. Knowing the EXACT state of the clutch in the car you buy is a must. HAVE IT INSPECTED BY SOMEONE THAT KNOWS LAMBOS - do not trust "receipts". Anecdotal comments like "it feels ok" mean nothing.

4) Odds are that parts for the actual engine etc would be available but misc other parts, especially decorative, would be where problems will arrise.

The car doesn't need constant work, once running nicely/properly (which maybe the concern buying an older car) I think most would agree they require little to keep going. But when there is a need, it probably will be a biggie.

-mick
 

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I have a 92 Diablo.

Echo Gday comments. Some early cars had issues with chain tensioners, but there is an update kit, which your car should have by now. Also some cars had problems with the factory head gasket. Both are a one time fix.

Coming from a 355 spider, I was surprised how easy this car is to work on. The early 2WD's are a piece of cake. You can do your own 15/30K service. Everything simple and straightforward.

Yes, some clutch's go at 10K, some people here have 30K on the original. You can point to driver skill, perhaps, but IMHO all Diablo's need a stronger clutch for that kind of HP. A member has found a Japaneese company who makes a 750 hp rated clutch for $3K. He installed it last month and we will see how it goes...so far so good.

Parts have not been a problem for me. For example yesterday I needed a small rubber pad that goes on the brake pedal. Called the dealer and it was in stock - pretty good.

Engine and Trans are bullet proof. You can rest your fears of "constant work".

BTW - Now I'm looking for a roadster. I may be selling my 92 when I purchase the roadster. PM me if you want details.
 

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Buy it...you won't be sorry at any cost. Trust me...just did a full restoration on a 91.

Worth repeating
HAVE IT INSPECTED BY SOMEONE THAT KNOWS LAMBOS...
HAVE IT INSPECTED BY SOMEONE THAT KNOWS LAMBOS
HAVE IT INSPECTED BY SOMEONE THAT KNOWS LAMBOS
HAVE IT INSPECTED BY SOMEONE THAT KNOWS LAMBOS
HAVE IT INSPECTED BY SOMEONE THAT KNOWS LAMBOS
HAVE IT INSPECTED BY SOMEONE THAT KNOWS LAMBOS
(why would you trust me...I'm from NYC. :D )
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
SI LAMBO said:
Buy it...you won't be sorry at any cost. Trust me...just did a full restoration on a 91.



(why would you trust me...I'm from NYC. :D )
Yes, I read and saw some of your work. The interior looks great.

Thanks for all the info, it is very much appreciated. When you say "have it inspected by someone..." do you mean have a dealer look at it? I have seen some people indicate their car is getting a "PPI" - What exactly is that?

And You're from Staten Island, no? Are you actually going to drive your car on the roads over there!? SI is on par to NJ with road condition. (I'm still trying to map out 'safe routes' to drive on.)

MJB
 

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Have someone you trust look at the car. Depending on where the car is located, you may want to ask on this board who is qualified locally. Try to get the history. Not just CARFAX.

I agree with you about the roads, they are very bad. I tried to start a thread regarding a Lamborghini road map, but it didn't really work out. I usually take the Corvette out first to test the roads and make notes.

Good thing about the older cars is time brought to light all the problems. The question is how many have been corrected on the car you will purchase. If a car is the right price and needs work, make sure that you know what the cost is. I think you will find many qualified techs (some better than others) but parts and labor for this baby are not cheap.

You may want to head out to the Poconos this weekend. Sunday 12 Lamborghinis will be displayed and a good learning experience.

Good luck.
 

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Turbo50Mike said:
do you mean have a dealer look at it? I have seen some people indicate their car is getting a "PPI" - What exactly is that?
Pre Purchase Inspection and generally speaking, means someone knowledgeable that doesn't have a vested interest in the car doing the review. Its not neccessarily done to decide to buy the car or not but rather to make sure that the price matches what up front work maybe required ie the car may need a new clutch - no biggie just make sure the price of the car reflects that.

-mick
 
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