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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Team,

Let's say I take really great care of a Huracan and keep up with all oil changes and recommended maintenance. Over the course of 8 to 10 years, I end up getting about 180k - 200k miles out of the Huracan. At this point, I realize that Lamborghini is no longer manufacturing new Huracans and I am still absolutely in love with my vehicle. Maybe I'm willing to primarily drive another car, but naturally, I will want to hang onto the Huracan.

I am reaching out to the experience Huracan owners of this forum to gain a rough estimate of what it would cost to put a new Huracan engine and possibly transmission in the car so that I could essentially refresh the car back to the state it was in when the Huracan was new and ultimately double the life of the car. How much would the parts and labor cost to have something like that done? I assume well over $100k, but I'm genuinely curious.

Any feedback you have would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 

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How far into the future are you talking? In today's money, somebody on here had their motor replaced and I believe the bill as +-&67k, that's not the trans though. You can find used engines on ebay for less but that is not installed so...
 

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Pretty far out there hypothetical question that no one without a crystal ball could answer. My best guess would be get the engine and tranny rebuilt rather than replaced and it would not be anywhere close to $100k unless you have a major failure. You would probably be able to buy a Huracán with far less miles for low $100's at that point so that would most likely be a better option. I guess check back in 8-10 years.......
 

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I think they are around $30k for engine and $20k for trans. Yep, it can reach $100k easy when you include human hours.

Unless the car is collectible or you like the car very much, buying a new one maybe better.

The car won't break in 10 years or 200K as long as the maintenance is done properly. I try to do my maintenance a bit early and try not to drive the car often like in racetrack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Why wouldn’t you just get the Huracan successor if you’re going to spend that kind of coin?
You bring up a great point. By 7 or 8 years from now, Lamborghini will unlikely still be making the Huracan. If I really enjoyed the car and many great memories with it, I may still want to hang onto it because it would become collectable and even more rare as it is no longer being made. If that is the case, I wouldn't be at all surprised if I decide to have a new engine/transmission put in the Huracan to bring it back to the condition it was in when new. And at the same time, I may also spring for that new Huracan successor you are referring to as well. Think about the benefits of having both. One could always be in my garage while driving the other. If one needs to be in the shop for maintenance, I could drive the opposite car. What do you think?
 

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An 8 year old run of the mill Gallardo is neither rare or collectible. Compared to the H it is objectively slower with dated interior and user interface. Subjectively it is a dated design.
 

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I would completely rule out having your engine and/or trans rebuilt 10 years from now. Even 30 years ago, it was hard to find someone that could rebuild either with good reliability. Today, you're more likely to get hit by lightning than find someone to do a good job rebuilding either. In 10 years, you'll have a better chance of winning the mega lottery. Those types of skilled and detailed services are just going by the wayside as we adopt more and more the the replace-rather-than-repair approach, and engines have become much more complete with variable valve timing, fancy overhead cams, timing chains everywhere, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I would completely rule out having your engine and/or trans rebuilt 10 years from now. Even 30 years ago, it was hard to find someone that could rebuild either with good reliability. Today, you're more likely to get hit by lightning than find someone to do a good job rebuilding either. In 10 years, you'll have a better chance of winning the mega lottery. Those types of skilled and detailed services are just going by the wayside as we adopt more and more the the replace-rather-than-repair approach, and engines have become much more complete with variable valve timing, fancy overhead cams, timing chains everywhere, etc.
I believe what you are saying about the skill of rebuilding an engine being rare and the risk an owner would take trusting someone who may not do the job properly. To mitigate that risk, what about having Lamborghini themselves install a new engine and transmission? Based on your knowledge and experience, do you estimate that having Lamborghini do an important job like that would mitigate the risk of a less skilled person doing a substandard job and introducing potentially serious, long term maintenance issues?
 

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I would completely rule out having your engine and/or trans rebuilt 10 years from now. Even 30 years ago, it was hard to find someone that could rebuild either with good reliability. Today, you're more likely to get hit by lightning than find someone to do a good job rebuilding either. In 10 years, you'll have a better chance of winning the mega lottery. Those types of skilled and detailed services are just going by the wayside as we adopt more and more the the replace-rather-than-repair approach, and engines have become much more complete with variable valve timing, fancy overhead cams, timing chains everywhere, etc.
I think it would be easier than you think to find someone to work on these cars. Normal people put these things together in the first place. Depending on my health, when the time to rebuild comes, I would do it myself. There are locking pins to hold the cams in place so the computer doesn't freak out on initial start up. Audi uses locking pins to hold lots of parts in place during an engine build. I do agree a good mechanic is hard to find, but not impossible. There are tuners today that will rebuild the engine and trans, pretty sure they are not going to stop as long as there is a market.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think it would be easier than you think to find someone to work on these cars. Normal people put these things together in the first place. Depending on my health, when the time to rebuild comes, I would do it myself. There are locking pins to hold the cams in place so the computer doesn't freak out on initial start up. Audi uses locking pins to hold lots of parts in place during an engine build. I do agree a good mechanic is hard to find, but not impossible. There are tuners today that will rebuild the engine and trans, pretty sure they are not going to stop as long as there is a market.
The idea of making a Huracan my daily driver and driving it until it has 200k miles, then searching for someone to install a new engine and transmission 8-10 years later sounds like such a fun project! I am really excited about the idea.
 

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I think it would be easier than you think to find someone to work on these cars. Normal people put these things together in the first place. Depending on my health, when the time to rebuild comes, I would do it myself. There are locking pins to hold the cams in place so the computer doesn't freak out on initial start up. Audi uses locking pins to hold lots of parts in place during an engine build. I do agree a good mechanic is hard to find, but not impossible. There are tuners today that will rebuild the engine and trans, pretty sure they are not going to stop as long as there is a market.
Never said they won’t offer to do it. I am sure they will line up to charge you the Lambo tax. What I am saying is there’s a very good chance they won’t do it right. Many examples. DDE on YouTube spent $25k to have his Murci engine rebuilt, and after a year of them working on it, he had to buy a replacement engine when they were done. The skilled labor that cares to do it right is rare in that industry. If you can do it yourself and you want to do it, then you have a good chance of doing it right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Never said they won’t offer to do it. I am sure they will line up to charge you the Lambo tax. What I am saying is there’s a very good chance they won’t do it right. Many examples. DDE on YouTube spent $25k to have his Murci engine rebuilt, and after a year of them working on it, he had to buy a replacement engine when they were done. The skilled labor that cares to do it right is rare in that industry. If you can do it yourself and you want to do it, then you have a good chance of doing it right.
Stimpy, very interesting concern. I fully agree with you and the DDE is a great example. But I have one important question for you: What if I pay to have a NEW Lamborghini V10 engine and a new transmission, and then I pay someone to install that instead of rebuilding an older engine with 200k miles on it. Do you estimate that this would mitigate the risk of someone not doing the job right, similar to what happened in the DDE example? I was interested in exploring buying a new engine and transmission after 200k miles instead of doing a rebuild. Thanks.
 

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Stimpy, very interesting concern. I fully agree with you and the DDE is a great example. But I have one important question for you: What if I pay to have a NEW Lamborghini V10 engine and a new transmission, and then I pay someone to install that instead of rebuilding an older engine with 200k miles on it. Do you estimate that this would mitigate the risk of someone not doing the job right, similar to what happened in the DDE example? I was interested in exploring buying a new engine and transmission after 200k miles instead of doing a rebuild. Thanks.
If you buy a new engine and transmission from the factory, then you can feel confident those are good to go and you are removing a lot of risk. How well they are installed will be a roll of the dice, but a much smaller gamble than having those units rebuilt.
 
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