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2011 Gallardo Superleggera
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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,

Just picked up my first Lamborghini on Friday. Super excited about the car and it's been an absolute blast so far.

When I purchased the car, the seller made me aware of some damaged to the carbon pieces on the car, specifically the deck lid, spoiler and rear diffuser. It appears the clear coat has some sun spots as well as chipping. Before purchasing the car I was under the impression that I'd simply be able to have these pieces sanded and recleared to look good as new. However, I just took the car to a body shop up the street from me that works on a lot of Lambo's and the owner told me it's too risky to try to sand down the clear on carbon pieces. He said the carbon will likely get damaged since the clear is so thin and that my best bet would be to try and email lamborghini corporate for a replacement since the clear coat has faded.

I'm just wondering if anyone else has had similar issues, and if so, what did you do to fix them? Looking forward to everyones responses and excited to finally be a part of this forum!
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2018 Huracan Spyder 580-2
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I would go somewhere else that does CF work. We have members here that have restored their own CF and done a perfect job DIY. I am certian it can be refinished, you need a second opinion from someone that does CF exclusively.
 

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2011 Gallardo Superleggera
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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for the quick response. I will definitely look into that!
 

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Russk is spot on, it can be repaired but you've got to find someone with experience doing it, that's the hard part. From the looks of it there are a couple spots where the epoxy has delaminated from the fiber, so I would first try to wick new epoxy into that gap. If that doesn't work then you'd have to sand down the epoxy until you just barely start to reach the fiber (that takes some experience), and then recoat the entire part. I did this on my carbon fiber steering wheel among many other parts (search YouTube for lamborghini steering wheel repair). Because you have to recoat and refinish the entire part those types of repairs are very times-taking. I think your guy's suggestion about emailing Lamborghini corporate to discuss having them replace decade old carbon fiber due to fading and delamination is futile though.
 

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2019 Huracan 580-2
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Agree, I was delivered a brand new 2RS that had a defect in the CF frunk lid and they had a detailer come out and he did an amazing job.......couldn't tell there was a problem. I think those defects above can be polished out. You need to find a quality detailer.
 

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Clear coat buffing compound to smoothen the blur then re-coat & polish is the only way. If you are handy, you can DIY it as fun project. The buffing needs patience, but re-coating & polishing are very easy.
 

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If the epoxy has delaminated from the fiber no amount of buffing compound is going to get the defect out. Just as with cracked carbon fiber (where the epoxy cracks), you need to sand the defective epoxy away completely, then recoat with epoxy and refinish (either polish the epoxy layer or apply a layer of clear coat, up to you).

In some cases, if there is even just a small crack in the epoxy where it has delaminated you can get fresh epoxy to wick into the crack, and fill the gap where it delaminated which will greatly reduce the appearance of the defect.
 

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2011 Gallardo Superleggera
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Discussion Starter #8
If the epoxy has delaminated from the fiber no amount of buffing compound is going to get the defect out. Just as with cracked carbon fiber (where the epoxy cracks), you need to sand the defective epoxy away completely, then recoat.
Yes I agree. There is no way I think I'd be able to fix any of this with buffing. The clear even appears to be yellowing in certain areas.

My fear is that from what a lot of people tell me, CF is very hard to sand properly, and it's very easy to go right through the clear and damage the actual weave. Is there any truth to that? I've been thinking about taking it here to see what they can do: Services | Carbon Fiber and Composite Structural Repair | Flower Hill Auto Body | Roslyn, NY
 

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I can work you a deal on a new wing that's guaranteed not to do that, but you have to decide if you want to tackle the repair option. Another issue I've seen on the SL's is the rear window plexi start to delaminate. Some have replaced that will real glass from a non SL.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I can work you a deal on a new wing that's guaranteed not to do that, but you have to decide if you want to tackle the repair option. Another issue I've seen on the SL's is the rear window plexi start to delaminate. Some have replaced that will real glass from a non SL.
OEM or aftermarket? If I replace the wing I'm honestly thinking of going with something slightly bigger.
 

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Some have replaced that will real glass from a non SL.
But Jason think of how slow the car would feel after you did that! Kidding of course.

My fear is that from what a lot of people tell me, CF is very hard to sand properly, and it's very easy to go right through the clear and damage the actual weave. Is there any truth to that? I've been thinking about taking it here to see what they can do: Services | Carbon Fiber and Composite Structural Repair | Flower Hill Auto Body | Roslyn, NY
There is truth to that. However, I think it is a bit exaggerated. If you're trying to repair the part and you don't know what you're doing, say your sanding dry with 220 grit or something, yeah you'll ruin the part in no time. Similarly if you're sanding even with a higher grit like 400 and you're using a power tool like an orbital sander you can ruin the part in no time and sand right through the carbon fiber. The key is to wet sand by hand and very slowly approach the fiber. I use 400 grit. You will see the sanding residue go from being white (from the epoxy) to grey as you just start to reach the fiber. It actually takes quite a bit of wet sanding with 400 grit to really mess up the weave. But as soon as you see a tiny bit of grey, stop sanding, and the fiber will look just fine once you get a fresh coat of epoxy on. Also, you'll see the sheen of the fiber change as the epoxy becomes extremely thin as you sand so you'll have some idea as you're getting close. It really isn't that hard in general, it just takes doing it a few times to see that stuff to understand it and have a good feel for it.
 
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