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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just did the RWD conversion w/ swapping to Swift Springs. LOVE everything, BUT notice a bit more 'jounce' than expected in the front. Swift apparently has only one part# for ALL LP Gallardo models. That would suggest they may perform differently in RWD to AWD models. Spring rate not quite matching the valving? It's somewhat acceptable, may even get used to it after some seat time. I think I remember somebody saying something about this and adding some weight back to it by installing the transfer case back in (no way I'm doing that)
Can anyone relate, try any sort of simple trick... maybe adjustable end links (shorter) to compensate? I saw a thread on a different forum about 'timing' or clocking all the (sleeved) bushings in the suspension. This basically is a matter of loosening all those bushings while the suspension is Loaded and re-tightening them. Obviously not easy to do because the wheels are mounted on the car in that scenario. NEVER thought of that before when putting suspensions together with wheels off, suspension at full extension giving it some kind of pre-loaded condition? Here is the thread posted by BMR who are suspension gurus:

Summary if you're not reading it yet ----
We have seen cars change ride height by as much as 3/8" by simply re-clocking the bushings after a spring install. In a multi-link suspension such as the Zeta platform, this condition becomes even more pronounced because of the multiple links. More links means more bushings and more bushings means more potential for pre-load if not setup properly.

In summary, re-clocking the bushings should be as much a priority as aligning your car after a spring install. Hopefully this has been helpful to those that were not understanding why or how to do this procedure.
 

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Yes, loosening all of that while on an alignment rack with all the weight on the suspension is always a good idea, otherwise things can be in a slight bind.

You could compensate your spring rate slightly with a thinner upper and/or lower pad on the coil spring. This will obviously result in lowering the car a bit more as well, but will make the spring a little less compressed making it not as stiff.

Sometimes where you clock the end of the coil springs (towards the inner or outer edge of car) can find you the slight feeling change you are looking for as well. Can't remember if our cars have a lower perch that dictates only one position of the spring.
 
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The Swift lowering springs for Stigs Persian Cousins AWD LP Super Trofeo was way off for ride, handling and steering...very stiff in the front and very soft in the rear. This stiffness balance should be even worse for your RWD conversion with the loss of weight up front. Is your steering now much lighter with a lack of center feel?

Further, yes then the dampers are also not matched to the new spring stiffness. (the biggest issue with lowering springs). I was actually surprised how bad SPC's car was with major modifications in his attempt to get the steering response, steering feel, predictability and confidence back in his car with no success after he did the Swift lowering springs early on. Then he asked us to do a full custom Ohlins TTX coilover (4way adjustable damping) setup for him as shown here that gave him exactly what he was looking for in steering, ride and handling. See this link:


Clocking bushings in arms when lowering to "re-center" them. You can do this, but the bushing torsional rates are low compared to the main spring rates so it has a small effect on your cars feel and ride height...though the swift lowering 30 mm is a fair amount. Our '05-'06 Ford GT customers lower their cars 20-25 mm with our setup and do not re-center the bushings. Our math includes these bushing rates for pre-setting the spring perches for their desired ride height.

See this link for our LP Ohlins TTX Ahlman Performance Stage II (balance of road and track) set up. Yes it does not have front end lift at this point and we do not recommend lowering more than 10-12 mm (we set if for you) because of the limited travel of the front of the LP's while maintaining great ride.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The Swift lowering springs for Stigs Persian Cousins AWD LP Super Trofeo was way off for ride, handling and steering...very stiff in the front and very soft in the rear. This stiffness balance should be even worse for your RWD conversion with the loss of weight up front. Is your steering now much lighter with a lack of center feel?
This sounds to be an accurate description, stiffness balance must be off makes sense, and the steering IS lighter. Considering the tight clearances up front, making it 'softer' wouldn't likely be good. If the rear were tighter it may feel more balanced and make what I'm experiencing less obvious. OK, Wow, now were getting technical and I appreciate the education. I will probably try some simple adjustments before getting deeply involved in a solution. After all, this car to me is just a summer fun, weekend, blast it around town thing.
 

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I didn't read through that other thread but I doubt the bushings will make any large impact on the feel of the car.

I also have swift springs and I'm still AWD. I've also noticed the ride change for the worse. I was surprised because so many people on the forums said it rode just like stock. I thought maybe it was because my car was spec'd with the comfort suspension.

Honestly I think if it bothers you enough, upgrade to the ohlins and I bet it'll be a world of difference. For me, it rides sporty but not incredibly annoying, so I'm perfectly good with it.
 
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This sounds to be an accurate description, stiffness balance must be off makes sense, and the steering IS lighter. Considering the tight clearances up front, making it 'softer' wouldn't likely be good. If the rear were tighter it may feel more balanced and make what I'm experiencing less obvious. OK, Wow, now were getting technical and I appreciate the education. I will probably try some simple adjustments before getting deeply involved in a solution. After all, this car to me is just a summer fun, weekend, blast it around town thing.
Ok this all makes sense. Glad to help. As you can see SPC did some major changes with no impact on what you are experiencing. At 7 min 11 sec in the video I say "oh that's understeer" was in a 80 mph sweeper (with this Swift lowering spring setup) that should have been a non-event as I don't slide cars on the road. However, the front took off like I was on gravel or some huge aerodynamic issue. I easily went through many corners like that in his car after our Ohlins TTX install...but 10 mph faster with no drama.

I get what you are saying, but while you can go fast with our set up the best part is just engaging you in the beautiful LP with far more predictable/intuitive response in steering, handling and comfortable ride. And leaving you plenty of margin on the road that you do not have now. My biggest concern with that setup is an evasive maneuver and its reaction. You will have to stiffen rear springs a fair amount (about 60 N/mm to go with their fronts) and then the damping is still way off front and rear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I didn't read through that other thread but I doubt the bushings will make any large impact on the feel of the car.

I also have swift springs and I'm still AWD. I've also noticed the ride change for the worse. I was surprised because so many people on the forums said it rode just like stock. I thought maybe it was because my car was spec'd with the comfort suspension.

Honestly I think if it bothers you enough, upgrade to the ohlins and I bet it'll be a world of difference. For me, it rides sporty but not incredibly annoying, so I'm perfectly good with it.
I agree totally with everything you said there. These posts got me thinking again and my method of install (doing both the conversion and the springs at the same time) may have confused the issue........ IF, I had done the springs first and still had the AWD I would perhaps have had your experience and may not have had issue with it...
So maybe it's not the springs at all but the fact that I now have an AWD damper in a RWD car. Didn't do it yet but I bet if I look up the part# for the front coil assembly it will be different for the two cars and the Spyder may even be different from the coupe so there might be at least 4 different part numbers.. WRONG FRONT DAMPER ? ❗
 

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There are like 18 strut part codes or something like that for LP gallardos, I just went through that hassle because one of mine had a piece for the front lift break off. Extremely confusing. Not sure of the actual differences but I'm sure there is some dampener changes.

I think it's just the springs though, I bet it feels similar even with the proper dampener. Just a downside of lowering a car with aftermarket springs when the dampener wasn't designed or valved for the aftermarket spring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
There are like 18 strut part codes or something like that for LP gallardos, I just went through that hassle because one of mine had a piece for the front lift break off. Extremely confusing. Not sure of the actual differences but I'm sure there is some dampener changes.

I think it's just the springs though, I bet it feels similar even with the proper dampener. Just a downside of lowering a car with aftermarket springs when the dampener wasn't designed or valved for the aftermarket spring.
Makes sense, that's it in a nutshell...... well my projects are done for this year. I got schooled about Ohlins from Scott and if this bothers me enough THAT will be my project next year ❗
Thanks for the response Brothers
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Synopsis ---
Sometimes we talk ourselves into things we Know may not go as positively as we would expect (or hope is the better word) only to realize later on, that we knew all along, what we should have done in the first place. We spend money to save money and end up spending more because we tried to save. Haha, does that make freakin' sense? ---- You buy the $700 spring kit because the several thousand dollar coil-over kit is 'overkill' ... then realize that ride quality REALLY DOES MATTER TO YOU and now you have to go and spend the money you originally thought you saved to make it right ❗

You would expect a car like this is optimally suspension tuned from the factory for the equipped options. If you change it, you are going to sacrifice SOMETHING. Unfortunately $700 springs for a Lamborghini aren't going to be much different than $200 springs for a Honda...... ok, to be fair, Swift Springs have done their homework to make them the best they could possibly be, given the task of Lowering the ride height of the car without throwing ride quality right out the window. No matter what, there is going to be some degree of sacrifice. My situation is likely worse than average because I probably need RWD front dampers as well.

If the cars' stock ride height is not acceptable and lowering is in order you must evaluate your own personal preferences in order to deviate from Factory ride quality.

1) If lowering the car is your ONLY concern and you could care less about the ride --- Do a Spring Swap
2) If lowering the car is a concern, AND you wish to Optimize the ride quality to the new ride height ---- Now you have to seriously consider investing in a quality Complete suspension setup as described above
 
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