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The rear brake pads look really thin while the front ones still look super thick. I changed brake pads maybe twice back in high school. I would love to pay someone to do it but I have no idea who to take it to. The shop I’m gonna use for maintenance is about 120 miles away and I really don’t want to make the trip down there unless I need to.

Is there anything difficult about changing the two rear brake pads that is different than a non-exotic?
 

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The rear brake pads look really thin while the front ones still look super thick. I changed brake pads maybe twice back in high school. I would love to pay someone to do it but I have no idea who to take it to. The shop I’m gonna use for maintenance is about 120 miles away and I really don’t want to make the trip down there unless I need to.

Is there anything difficult about changing the two rear brake pads that is different than a non-exotic?
The most difficult part is writing the check 😀

ps
I’m interested in hearing what people say.
I change entire break systems on normal cars a couple times a year. My guess is they are the same.

get the tire off
Remove the bolts holding the caliper
Slide caliper up, hang caliper or get someone to hold it
Remove break pads
Apply anticease on any metal on metal clips.
Slowly Use c-clamp to compress caliper piston (make sure break fluid reservoir is cracked open to allow piston to be compressed)
Insert new pads
Slide caliper back on
Bolt caliper back on (to torque spec)
Put tire back on.
Repeat with other wheels.

may want to place a towel under brake reservoir, as brake fluid will eat and discolor paint!

I keep the hood open and place a cap on the reservoir, to remind me to put the reservoir cap back on!!

good luck!
 

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I would vote to DIY, and Angel worded the process best. My only note is that removing the wheels may actually be the hard bit. Lamborghini wheels are typically tricky to remove without hassle because of how recessed the lug nuts are within the wheel. But there's got to be a specialized extension or removal tool you can use for this, just haven't looked into it myself.

Also, be equally careful putting the wheel back on and tightening the bolts.
 

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I would vote to DIY, and Angel worded the process best. My only note is that removing the wheels may actually be the hard bit. Lamborghini wheels are typically tricky to remove without hassle because of how recessed the lug nuts are within the wheel. But there's got to be a specialized extension or removal tool you can use for this, just haven't looked into it myself.

Also, be equally careful putting the wheel back on and tightening the bolts.
There's nothing "tricky" about it just because its a Lamborghini vs any other wheel.

Get one of these

And a set of these

And take the wheel off.
 

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Remove the bolts holding the caliper
Slide caliper up, hang caliper or get someone to hold it
Most of the time if only doing pads on monoblock calipers you don't even need to remove the caliper. Haven't needed to on any of my Porsches. Haven't done the brakes yet on the G, but if memory from just looking at it is correct it will be the same. The only one I had to remove the caliper was a GT350. The caliper is so big it has a built in strap in the center connecting both sides so you can't slide the pads out.

There's nothing "tricky" about it just because its a Lamborghini vs any other wheel.

Get one of these

And a set of these

And take the wheel off.
I've had German cars that use wheel bolts for 15 years now. I never felt the need for wheel locators. Then a year or two ago I needed to give someone an idea for a small Christmas gift for me. I sent a link for a pair of the wheel locators. The first time I used them I realized I should have gotten them a long time ago. They turn a simple task that requires concentration into one that can be done basically mindlessly.
 

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Most of the time if only doing pads on monoblock calipers you don't even need to remove the caliper. Haven't needed to on any of my Porsches. Haven't done the brakes yet on the G, but if memory from just looking at it is correct it will be the same. The only one I had to remove the caliper was a GT350. The caliper is so big it has a built in strap in the center connecting both sides so you can't slide the pads out.



I've had German cars that use wheel bolts for 15 years now. I never felt the need for wheel locators. Then a year or two ago I needed to give someone an idea for a small Christmas gift for me. I sent a link for a pair of the wheel locators. The first time I used them I realized I should have gotten them a long time ago. They turn a simple task that requires concentration into one that can be done basically mindlessly.
Just curious, normally when pads are worn out, the caliper pistons are extended, thus trying to slide in pads is difficult. Thus the need to use the clamp to push the piston back in.

Are you saying Porsches have piston calipers that retract fully to allow the pads to slide in? Thanks.
 

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Just curious, normally when pads are worn out, the caliper pistons are extended, thus trying to slide in pads is difficult. Thus the need to use the clamp to push the piston back in.

Are you saying Porsches have piston calipers that retract fully to allow the pads to slide in? Thanks.
You still need to push the pistons back in. I think there might be special tools for this, but I like to just pry the backing plate of the old pads with the reservoir cap of. Using the backing plate like that allows you to push in all the pistons evenly rather than fighting them, pushing one in while the one next to it gets pushed out.
 

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Just curious, normally when pads are worn out, the caliper pistons are extended, thus trying to slide in pads is difficult. Thus the need to use the clamp to push the piston back in.

Are you saying Porsches have piston calipers that retract fully to allow the pads to slide in? Thanks.
If you just open the bleeder screw slightly you should be able to push the pistons back in by hand, and the little fluid that leaks out will not be enough that you're introducing any air into the system. Just top up at the reservoir when you're done with all the brakes.
 

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Some good advice in this thread... and as usual there will always be difference of opinion. There exists a brake piston compression tool that is inserted between the pads and when you press the handle it actually expands, equally pressing the pistons back into the caliper equally. In addition to removing the brake fluid reservoir cap, I would also use a food basting tool to suck out some fluid to you have room to hold the fluid you will push out. My personal choice is to not do this at the caliper bleed screw as there is a greater chance to suck in a little air... I question why the rear pads are so much more worn than the fronts, other than the previous owner recently replaced the front pads. I would also consider getting a one man bleed kit and flushing out and replacing the brake fluid... it does get dirty and also can absorb moisture, leading to a soft pedal and decreased performance. Just my .02...
 

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The rear brake pads look really thin while the front ones still look super thick. I changed brake pads maybe twice back in high school. I would love to pay someone to do it but I have no idea who to take it to. The shop I’m gonna use for maintenance is about 120 miles away and I really don’t want to make the trip down there unless I need to.

Is there anything difficult about changing the two rear brake pads that is different than a non-exotic?
How old is the vehicle?
for a rear engine vehicle, I would expect the rear pads would be worn slightly more than the fronts. From a safety point of view, strong rear braking is desired(better handling). Also, maybe the lasttime the pads were done, the mechanic didn’t do all 4 pads.
I would fully bleed out all the old brake fluids. Start the bleed process with the tire furthest away from the reservoir. When installing the pads, if the pistons don’t move, they might be seized up. Might need to refurbish them or buy new calipers.
 

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I did the front and rear on my 2005 and it was easy; follow the advise above about retracting the calipers and you'll be fine

Get the Motive Products brake bleeder with the European adapter. I use a right-angle swivel adapter in the car so it fits in the tiny space

You have 3 choices of brake pads:
1. OEM: Very expensive (but you know they are compatible)
2. NAPA: quite good
3. Hawk: you can choose different compounds for different uses and different compromises between brake performance and life. That is the way I went
 

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Here is a link to a video on replacing the rear brake pads and rotors on a Gallardo. Lamborghini Gallardo Rear Brake Pad & Rotor Replacement

The EBC red pads work good for street driving and do cut down on some of the brake dust but do not do well if you are doing driving that requires consistent heavy braking. I have used these at a few charity lap events and the brakes heat fade rather quickly.
 

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Here is a link to a video on replacing the rear brake pads and rotors on a Gallardo. Lamborghini Gallardo Rear Brake Pad & Rotor Replacement

The EBC red pads work good for street driving and do cut down on some of the brake dust but do not do well if you are doing driving that requires consistent heavy braking. I have used these at a few charity lap events and the brakes heat fade rather quickly.
We would not recommend Redstuff pads for the track. These are a low dust pad but not for track use.
 
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