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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am having my brake calipers rebuilt and have been looking into
brake fluid (funny how you start studying minutae when you do
something like this). Everyone without exception has told me NOT to
use synthetics so I won't.

Castrol LM has been recommeded, but I have read some very good
things about ATE Typ 200 (I think it is a German product, comes in
metal cans). It has higher wet and dry boiling points than the
Castrol, is not a synthetic (contains only dead carbon based life
forms), is DOT 3/4 compatible and has very low moisture absorption
properties. Looks extremely good on paper. Anyone use this stuff
on their Lamborghini's? How about Castrol LM? What are people
using for brake fluid? Last thing I want to do is go through
caliper rebuilds and use something that is going to screw up my
seals or hoses.

Thanks for your input.

Alberto
 

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aajr said:
I am having my brake calipers rebuilt and have been looking into
brake fluid (funny how you start studying minutae when you do
something like this). Everyone without exception has told me NOT to
use synthetics so I won't.

Castrol LM has been recommeded, but I have read some very good
things about ATE Typ 200 (I think it is a German product, comes in
metal cans). It has higher wet and dry boiling points than the
Castrol, is not a synthetic (contains only dead carbon based life
forms), is DOT 3/4 compatible and has very low moisture absorption
properties. Looks extremely good on paper. Anyone use this stuff
on their Lamborghini's? How about Castrol LM? What are people
using for brake fluid? Last thing I want to do is go through
caliper rebuilds and use something that is going to screw up my
seals or hoses.

Thanks for your input.

Alberto

Agree, do not use synthetics. Castrol LM (LM= Low Moistire Activity) is a fine choice and has a boiling point far above anything you're likely to see on the street. . The ATE Fluid is best for track cars. It's real value is it's very high boiling point 550+.
 
G

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Good posts.

FWIW (which is nothing) I know for a fact that at least one of the top restoration shops (I'll remain very vague about this) does in fact use and recommend synthetics for miura/lp400 brake systems. I'm not about to try and add anything further to this discussion than that! I don't use synthetics in my 400gt so I can't tell you anything about long-term effects.

Best,

Fred
 

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at issue is the fact that Silicone/Synthetic Brake Fluids are not compatible with all types of older Rubber Seals and can cause damage and even failure of the system. So the rule of thumb became, if one is not absolutely certian the the seals in the said older car are compatible with synthetics then it's best to stick with mineral based fluids that one is sure is compatible.

:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
JRV:
Thanks for your input. I have decided to try the ATE because it has a higher wet and dry boiling point than Castrol LMA, is not a synthetic and has low moisture absorption properties. I want to have the higher boiling point because my Miura has solid rotors and am concerned about the higher temperatures and brake fading.

Fred:
I asked Gary Bobileff and Jeff Stephan and they both said NOT to use synthetics because it swells the rubber seals. Since I change brake fluid (and all others), it does not make sense for me to use the much more expensive synthetic stuff anyway.

Alberto
 
G

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aajr said:
Fred:
I asked Gary Bobileff and Jeff Stephan and they both said NOT to use synthetics because it swells the rubber seals.
Alberto
Hi Alberto. I know, I know... ;) White Post says the same thing. But read my post again, all I'm saying is that I know that at least one of the tippy-top guys uses synthetics in miuras and lp400s. fwiw!

Just throwing some information out there, I think it's good to know every angle on these things. If you want the best information -- with all due respect to both Gary and Jeff, who are authorities par excellance -- you'd have to take all of the actual seals to the manufacturer of the synthetic fluid and have an engineer test to see if they are compatible.

Course...nobody's going to do that. Which is where "general rules" come into play, like don't use synthetic fluid on miuras or countachs.

Well, I’m not a big believer in general rules. I don’t use synthetic fluid period. But my guess is that it’s not an issue with the newer seals. Just a guess, mind you. If all the seals throughout your car were new (ie: new manufacture) I’m just guessing that you’d be ok with synthetics.

Just a guess, I’m no engineer! And if I were doing one of these cars myself (actually, I did just did an lp400 brake system 2 weeks ago and I didn’t use synthetics, and in addition I cautioned the owner against them) -- I’d stick with the known fluid, as called out for on the rebuild instructions.

Cheers,

Fred
 
G

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JRV said:
So the rule of thumb became, if one is not absolutely certian the the seals in the said older car are compatible with synthetics then it's best to stick with mineral based fluids that one is sure is compatible.

:)
Yes! I absolutely agree with that JRV. :wave:

Fred
 
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