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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
@Jinster, curious minds want to know are you going to leave it in the up or down position going forward?

One thing I will relate again for the record, and it may helpful to other owners. When I used to clean my 3RS and 2RS I would put the FAL in the up position so I had better access to the wheel wells for cleaning until one time after the cleaning when I was lowering the FAL I heard a nasty screeching sound. So, did I wash the lubricant off of the exposed surfaces? Not sure but I no longer leave the FAL up when cleaning the car.
That's brave of you to work like that... if the electronics/seal should fail or do the unexpected, you might lose an arm or worse.... I used to crawl under jacked up cars in my car port to change oil and do other bits but have stopped doing that as I got older and realised the fragility of life..... :( If someone or something accidentally knocked out the jack, I would be fffff'ed.

I think you are right about the lubrication on the exposed rod. I makes sense to immediately drop the car so it slides down before the lubricant dries.... Just another aspect of this type of thing - things that you wouldn't even consider until you've experienced it...
 

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2022 Huracan EVO RWD (Ordered)
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That's brave of you to work like that... if the electronics/seal should fail or do the unexpected, you might lose an arm or worse.... I used to crawl under jacked up cars in my car port to change oil and do other bits but have stopped doing that as I got older and realised the fragility of life..... :( If someone or something accidentally knocked out the jack, I would be fffff'ed.
All points well taken but to be clear the only thing that was extended into the wheel well was a long brush the hand and the arm stayed on the cowardly side of the rubber side wall. ;)
 

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Nah... can't do that. The garage is underground and goes up to exit at a steep upslope, followed by an immediately downsloping pavement, followed by another upward bend where the pavement joins the road. If I try backing up that exit upslope, it will first destroy my clutch, and I will then probably hit a pedestrian on the pavement who won't be visible in my rear-view mirror because the pavement angles down. I can't approach the ramp/tip at an angle either - the exit is a narrow tunnel 6 metres long - my mirrors clear the steel posts of the exit gate by about 5cm on both sides, one of which will probably come off when I try to exit by reversing at speed.....

Come to think of it, I enter the same ramp down into the garage, requiring the lift. So backing up it without a lift won't clear anything at all.... Just adds clutch damage and mirror damage and pedestrian injury to the list.... :unsure:

I wonder if there is a way to install some sort of spring "pry-open" device to manually lift the springs that way? I can take off the front wheels in the garage, exposing the suspension strut and the springs, and maybe install some sort spring spacer like that?
Ok, after a critical analysis of your situation, if it fails in your garage, your best bet is to disassemble the vehicle and reassemble it outside of the garage.
 

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One thing I had read on an older post, mentioned not turning the vehicle when activating the lift. Not sure if this is accurate, just something a different thread had mentioned about preserving the lift system. An example, approaching your driveway and hitting the lift as you turn into the drive. Anyone know if this is true?
 

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One thing I had read on an older post, mentioned not turning the vehicle when activating the lift. Not sure if this is accurate, just something a different thread had mentioned about preserving the lift system. An example, approaching your driveway and hitting the lift as you turn into the drive. Anyone know if this is true?
Never heard that before but I think that sometimes we supercar owners can get wrapped around the axle with all the do's and mostly don'ts. :giggle: I believe in exercising care and common sense but these cars are just cars not holy relics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Ok, after a critical analysis of your situation, if it fails in your garage, your best bet is to disassemble the vehicle and reassemble it outside of the garage.
Thank you. I often come to the same conclusion with all my cars.... :)

But... in all seriousness, is there such a product, being the opposite of a shortened spring, that would pry apart the spacing between suspension springs, to temporarily raise the ride height?
 

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Thank you. I often come to the same conclusion with all my cars.... :)

But... in all seriousness, is there such a product, being the opposite of a shortened spring, that would pry apart the spacing between suspension springs, to temporarily raise the ride height?
Seems like you're trying to prepare for some kind of catastrophic failure that will never happen. It's not like the seals are going to completely fail out of nowhere and the car is going to slam to the ground and explode and then you'll be forced to drag the car's burning wreckage out of the carpark trailing parts behind it that are being ripped off the underside as you go. The more likely scenario is you're going to start noticing droplets of fluid on the ground under the area where the shocks are and then realize that something is leaking.

Take your car to a shop and put it up on a lift and then go look around under it, everything under there is pretty beefy, it's not like the car is made out of glass and the slightest thing is going to destroy it. All the time your spending on this could be spent out driving the car and enjoying it rather than worrying about what might go wrong. Best way to cure this is to take it out and beat on it a bit and realize at the end of the day it's a car, it's designed to be driven, and like everything mechanical on this planet at some point a part will fail. At that point you fix the issue and then go drive it some more.

There's at least 1000 things that could go wrong that renders the lift system inoperable, what if both fuel pumps fail and you can't start the engine? The lift wont work without the motor running so are you going to go buy two extra fuel pumps just in case? What if the ECU fries? Again the engine wont start so no front lift so might want to pick an extra ECU. What if a hydraulic line ruptures? better get an extra set of all those lines and keep them handy. I think you get the point...
 

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Thank you. I often come to the same conclusion with all my cars.... :)

But... in all seriousness, is there such a product, being the opposite of a shortened spring, that would pry apart the spacing between suspension springs, to temporarily raise the ride height?
Here鈥檚 a possible solution. Place 2 of these car casters under your front wheels. It should lift the front 3-4 inches. Then drive out of garage. This assumes the rear has good clearance (my Murci does).

 

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Two things, left Up = Bad plus if you have your car transported make sure after they load it that they put the lift back in the down position while in transport.
My theory on most of these seals that go bad is exactly this, leveling it in the up position while in transport.
 

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My theory on most of these seals that go bad is exactly this, leveling it in the up position while in transport.
That's one thing I specify to the carrier when my vehicles are transported especially ones I purchase from out of state.
 

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The system uses the car's power steering fluid to fill the lifting/bellow units on the shocks and lift the front. The unit is under high(er) pressure when the nose is lifted, so although there is no definitive word in the owner's manual about how to prevent wear on the system I'd say leaving it up is worse than raising and lowering it twice. The way I see it, the less time at high pressure the better.
Airliner bodies' life cycles are measured in number of pressure cycles, FYI. Static pressure evidently does not matter as much as pressure cycling. This is hydraulic seals about which we speak, however, but I still think less movement is better.
 

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Airliner bodies' life cycles are measured in number of pressure cycles, FYI. Static pressure evidently does not matter as much as pressure cycling. This is hydraulic seals about which we speak, however, but I still think less movement is better.
Interesting, depends on the situation though I think. The usable life being based on pressure cycles in an airframe is in regards to metal fatigue in the aluminum I'd assume, a real issue but calculable and predictable(ish) so a good metric to base life span or crack inspection schedules on. Static pressure can very much be an issue for polymer/rubber components like air bags, bellows, gaskets, and hoses due to creep. This would be less of an issue in an aluminum airframe because the operating temperatures aren't high (for creep to occur in aluminum). For rubber materials though creep can occur at much lower temperatures.

I really just wish the shocks weren't so silly expensive or there was a good aftermarket alternative, or rebuild kits for them. It's so easy to swap out the shocks that if there was a reasonably priced alternative I could care less about using the lift system a lot. Heck it's probably just a few o-rings needed to rebuild them.
 

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I really just wish the shocks weren't so silly expensive or there was a good aftermarket alternative, or rebuild kits for them. It's so easy to swap out the shocks that if there was a reasonably priced alternative I could care less about using the lift system a lot. Heck it's probably just a few o-rings needed to rebuild them.
This statement is spot on. These things are silly expensive and the aftermarket segment that rebuilds Bilstein shocks won鈥檛 do them because they are 鈥減roblematic鈥. The Koni yellow tops from the Diablo are easily rebuilt. If someone could figure the Gallardo Bilstein鈥檚 out there might be some money to be made. They seriously shouldn鈥檛 be failing at under 20,000 miles. Defective engineering in my opinion.
 

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If you do this on an AWD G you鈥檒l likely rocket the casters out from under the wheels. They鈥檒l end up stuck under your chassis or worse trapped between the wheel and fender.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
If you do this on an AWD G you鈥檒l likely rocket the casters out from under the wheels. They鈥檒l end up stuck under your chassis or worse trapped between the wheel and fender.
Yeah, I thought the same. Unless you put these under the wheels, and then get the towed out of the underground garage....
 

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Yeah, I thought the same. Unless you put these under the wheels, and then get the towed out of the underground garage....
I have a set and they are pretty terrible. Even on a smooth epoxy floor it is very hard to move a modern car without a few people helping. My Model A is about the heaviest thing I can move on my own. The casters don鈥檛 turn very well and the smallish wheels don鈥檛 roll easily. Hard to control. And you can forget about getting up an incline. I had to use the winch on my trailer to make any progress.
 
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